Lars Horntveth

Kaleidoscopic

by Nils Jacobson

18 February 2009

 

The second solo album from the young Norwegian leader of Jaga Jazzist is orchestral, like his first, but it consists of only one winding 37-minute track. The intention here, underscored by John Szwed’s liner notes about the cinematic sound, is to draw listeners along through the rise and fall of the music, pausing in various chambers along the way. In that sense Kaleidoscopic is magnetic and attractive, never harsh or unrelenting. Its themes mutate and interweave, rarely climaxing, yielding a sort of magical, otherworldly glow. The counterpoint and multiple overlays draw from minimalism, but the verdant sound and reliance on extension reflect impressionism… in any case, those links are neither derivative nor blatant. Horntveth’s acoustic approach, like what he’s done with Jaga Jazzist in a more electronic setting, draws its main strength from narrative and evolution. All that said, Kaleidoscopic is best suited for listeners attuned to its subtlety and lush, string-rich orchestral sound.

Kaleidoscopic

Rating:

 

We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong on the Internet. Please consider a donation to support our work as independent cultural critics and historians. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing and challenging times. Thanks everyone.

//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Violin Virtuoso L. Subramaniam Mesmerizes in Rare New York Performance (Photos)

// Notes from the Road

"Co-presented by the World Music Institute, the 92Y hosted a rare and mesmerizing performance from India's violin virtuoso L. Subramaniam.

READ the article