Ace Enders & A Million Different People

When I Hit the Ground

by Jason MacNeil

27 April 2009

 
cover art

Ace Enders & A Million Different People

When I Hit the Ground

(Vagrant)
US: 17 Mar 2009

Arthur Enders, aka Ace Enders, and his band begin this album with an almost paltry Angels & Airwaves “woes is me” anthem-like introduction on “Reintroduction” before finally opening the throttle and delivering some strong emo-punk tracks. “Take The Money and Run” is a good attempt at this, with nice melodies but with riffs and chops that a band like Taking Back Sunday could probably hone better. However, the group then switch gears with the acoustic “New Guitar”, a song that won’t come close to Plain White T’s “Delilah” but isn’t entirely disposable either despite being a hair over a minute. Enders however pulls the whiny angst cord one too many times on “The Only Thing I Have (The Sign)” and the formulaic title track, the latter sure to tug the heartstrings of 16-year-old girls everywhere. Sweet pop nuggets like “Reaction” atone for those mistakes as does the radio-friendly and summery “SOS”. The biggest surprise, yet for all the wrong reasons, has to be the country-tinged Bryan Adams-ish arena rock of “Where Do We Go From Here” that is rather aimless. The same can be said for the Fray-like melancholic piano fodder oozing from “Leader”.

When I Hit the Ground

Rating:

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