Alex Moulton

Exodus

by Alan Ranta

14 July 2008

 

There was a time, roughly 1975-1979 to narrow it down, when an album like this would have been pivotal. It’s an epic disco adventure through a Vangelis Blade Runner realm, complete with bouncy heartbeats and synth soundscapes as dense and the LA smog. However, since the golden age of coked-up clubbing, the funky house plague has taken all the best dirtball licks, sleazy horns, and slick strings, and four-four beat them into commercial sterility and beyond.

Unleashed to a generation of music fans with attention spans shorter than a one-bar sample, I’m not sure how many people will “get” this record. Those who do will already have a few early Cerrone albums in their library, and Exodus will sit proudly along side them. The debut album from Expansion Team boss Alex Moulton is a record caught out of time and succeeds amazingly as a time capsule. It will find the modest, appreciative audience it deserves, but it’s too unique and self-contained to bring disco back into the mainstream. The crossover appeal is fairly narrow. And yet, I find myself face down in a pile of powdered stimulants wondering if my iPhone dreams at night. Exodus is a real oddity.

cover art

Alex Moulton

Exodus

(Expansion Team)
US: 27 May 2008
UK: 9 Jun 2008

Exodus

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Topics: alex moulton
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