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Louis Armstrong

An American Icon

(Hip-O)

The consummate entertainer, Louis Armstrong was an equally gifted trumpet player and jazz vocalist. His classic New Orleans trumpet sound influenced generations of musicians and has popped up in retro swing—case in point, The Squirrel Nut Zippers. An American Icon gathers 60 songs from Armstrong’s most popular period 1946-1968 and includes all the essential tracks, like “Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans?,” “Basin Street Blues,” “When It’s Sleepy Time Down South,” and “Hello Dolly!.” Highlights also include duets with Ella Fitzgerald, and performances with Duke Ellington, the legendary New Orleans jazz figure Kid Ory, the great trombone giant Jack Teagarden, and piano meister Oscar Peterson.

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Sarah Zupko founded PopMatters, one of the largest independent cultural criticism magazines on the web, back in the Internet's early days of 1999. Zupko is a former Executive Producer for Tribune Media Services, the media syndication arm of the Tribune Company, and a 10-year veteran of Tribune. Her other pursuits involve writing historical fiction and research in the fields of Slavic and German history, as well as general European cultural and intellectual history. Zupko studied musicology, film, and drama at the University of Chicago and media theory at the University of Texas, where she received her M.A.


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3 Feb 2013
The recently released early recordings of Louis Armstrong remind us that no one made a more complete contribution to art in the 20th century.
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Nobody can explain why “Hello Dolly” hit #1 in 1964. But then, nobody can explain why Louis Armstrong didn't hit #1 all the time.
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Psalm 100 instructs, "Make a joyful noise unto the Lord!". What more joyful sound than the life-affirming song of protest, for that is the sound wrenched from the deepest grief and suffering, from exhausted and diseased lungs, and the voice raised in tuneful protest is among the most beautiful of human sounds. Sing out, indeed!
8 Oct 2006
Armstrong’s smiling countenance is the perfect foil for his remarkable technical skills; his interaction with both audience and band is wonderfully disarming, making the music even more accessible.
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