Black Devil Disco Club

28 After

by Neal Hayes

3 December 2006

 

Disco isn’t dead; it’s just been hanging out in the underworld for a while. In 2004, the album Disco Club by Black Devil, which was allegedly recorded in 1978, appeared, prompting critical acclaim and questions of authorship. Eventually, the album was revealed to be the work of French producer Bernard Fevre, but listeners were not sure if it were really 26 years old or a clever new recording. The album’s follow-up, 28 After, is just as ambiguous. Its analog noises and disco beats recall the ‘70s, but its intricate and experimental sound suggests a more modern genesis. The kaleidoscopic range of timbres and the meticulous production are outstanding: throughout the album, keyboards, percussion, and harmonious vocal samples anchor the beat, while crazy retro electronics set the mood of the music, which ranges from funky to cool and almost nocturnal. Overall, 28 After is an enjoyable and satisfying album that should appeal to dance fans from any era.

28 After

Rating:

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