Darla Farmer

Rewiring The Electric Forest

by Jason MacNeil

20 March 2008

 

Darla Farmer picks up where the Squirrel Nut Zippers left off. But unfortunately, this band and their collection of songs don’t quite jibe as smoothly, particularly the swinging, jazzy opener “The Quotient”—which sounds more like a bad Violent Femmes or They Might Be Giants cover than anything else. “History” fares better because of its oomph, sounding like an Appalachian-tinged homage to No Doubt. The band also seems to limp through “Mechanical Thoughts” as if they’re on auto-pilot. It’s a decent song but there’s so much going on here that the vocals (which later shriek) are fighting for space among guitars, drums, horns and piano. Darla Farmer also attempt to make the tempo-change part of most of the material, but seems to fall flat on their collective faces with “The Strangler Fig”, a tune that sounds better for some crappy musical than a concert stage. The record is consistently confusing and clamoring. There are few saving graces here, but the somewhat happy-go-lucky “The Cow That Drank Too Much” might placate a few who have braved the album this long. The big highlight, aside from the chipper, bouncy “Tommy Bones”, is the somber, tender “Tree on a Hill” which resembles Cat Power.

Rewiring the Electric Forest

Rating:

 

We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong online. Please consider a donation to support our work as an independent publisher devoted to the arts and humanities. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing and challenging times where advertising no longer covers our costs. We need your help to keep PopMatters publishing. Thank you.

 


//comments
//related
//Mixed media
//Blogs

20 Questions: Nashville Singer-Songwriter Natalie Hemby

// Sound Affects

"Natalie Hemby's Puxico is a standout debut from a songwriter who has been behind the scenes for over a decade.

READ the article