David Thomas Broughton

David Thomas Broughton vs. 7 Hertz

by Dan Raper

30 January 2008

 

In what’s been called a mini-album but is actually much closer to the real thing, David Thomas Broughton vs. 7 Hertz offers a series of sparse/dense experimental folk meditations. West Yorkshire-bred, London-based musician David Thomas Broughton has already put out a record of the sort that builds cults (2005’s The Complete Guide to Insufficiency), and here he’s even more obtuse. The collaboration with Leeds group 7 Hertz, which approaches jazz, classical and even klezmer music through improvisation, leads to a series of long (between 10 and 22 minutes), atmospheric compositions that take a single melodic idea, repeat a few times, and then let the musicians noodle around without obvious direction. Nevertheless, when he’s singing, Broughton’s voice is compelling – his mournful, vibrato-laden baritone a mix between Nick Drake and Antony. And as the pieces progress – “Weight of My Love” and the epic “River Outlet” especially – the music rises up to a point of glorious gothic cacophony, before catapaulting back to the original themes. If you have the patience to sit through a group like Jackie O Motherfucker’s extended deconstructions of American folk, you may also find in this collaboration a similar, clattering sort of hidden beauty.

David Thomas Broughton vs. 7 Hertz

Rating:

 

We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong on the Internet. Please consider a donation to support our work as independent cultural critics and historians. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing and challenging times where costs have risen and advertising has dropped precipitously. We need your help to keep PopMatters strong and growing. Thank you.

 

//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Saul Williams Commands Attention at Summerstage (Photos + Video)

// Notes from the Road

"Saul Williams played a free, powerful Summerstage show ahead of his appearance at Afropunk this weekend.

READ the article