Call for Feature Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Music

If I had to pick five people that I could meet in the music business, one of those persons would be Don Dixon. He is a master of all trades as a producer, session musician, songwriter and producer. He has been so busy with success from his myriad of music business dealings that he has not released a recording in a few years. Well, The Invisible Man was worth the wait.


The songs that comprise the recording have the theme that they are written from the perspective of a man at different ages. Indeed, this is an ambitious task, and would very likely fall flat or seem pretentious if the artist lacked anything less than supreme writing skills. In this case, Dixon delivers. From the opening track, “Invisible and Free,” Mr. Dixon puts on a clinic on how to write interesting melodies in a compact context, never sacrificing lyrical content. A highlight track is the rockin “Tax the Churches”. Certainly, the wisdom that derives from age, and the whimsy or folly of youth is hard to describe unless the writer feels that he or she can visualize it and paint a sonic picture for the listener. Here, if you listen closely, our subject has many moments, and it is a melodic, interesting journey.


As an aside, I recognized that Don’s friend, the great producer Mitch Easter, contributed here along with Don’s wife. There is a general feeling of camaraderie and warmth that comes from recording with those you feel close to, and this recording is a great example.


The Invisible Man is a recording for those who appreciate great writers like Jules Shear, Elvis Costello or someone like Elliott Smith. The focus is always on the songs, and that is the way it always is in my world.


Although the man described by Dixon may be invisible, it is obvious for everyone to see and hear that this man was lucky to have Don Dixon describe his world.

Tagged as: don dixon
Comments
Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.