Halifax

The Inevitablility of a Strange World

by Evan Sawdey

9 October 2006

 

The Inevitability of an Unoriginal Album

It was bound to happen, some day or another.  And the time has come.  Halifax gets the honor: An album that is entirely 100% unoriginal.  Literally.  I’ve listened to this album end-to-end twice, hoping to find an original lyric, unique chord change, but to no avail.  You know that generic song that comes to mind when you hear the term “emo-rock”?  Well if you can imagine that, then you’ve already heard their entire debut album.  Sometimes Drive-Thru Records is willing to go a wee bit risky, releasing emotional piano punk (Something Corporate) or techno-pop-rock (HelloGoodbye), but here has released the most uninteresting rock album in recent memory.  Single “Our Revolution” barely stands out above the rest, making perfect background music for some forthcoming Twisted Metal release, but The Inevitability of a Strange World has nothing to offer.  Even the pseudo-ballads like “A Tint of Rain” and “Murder I Wrote” follow cliche painfully close.  Never before in my years of being a music critic have I walked away from an album with not a single track to recommend.  Congratulations Halifax: you’re the first.

The Inevitablility of a Strange World

Rating:

 

We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong on the Internet. Please consider a donation to support our work as independent cultural critics and historians. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing and challenging times where costs have risen and advertising has dropped precipitously. We need your help to keep PopMatters strong and growing. Thank you.

 

//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Saul Williams Commands Attention at Summerstage (Photos + Video)

// Notes from the Road

"Saul Williams played a free, powerful Summerstage show ahead of his appearance at Afropunk this weekend.

READ the article