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Ideal Free Distribution

Ideal Free Distribution

(Happy Happy Birthday To Me; US: 2006)

Although it’s not quite a name that sends shockwaves through one’s body, Ideal Free Distribution sound like they were reared obsessively on early albums by The Kinks with some late psychedelic folk staples if “Apples and Oranges” is a measuring stick. Fans of The Raconteurs would also probably get into a number like the happy, buzz-tinged “The American Myth” or “Saturday Drive”, despite the fact that the guitars are buried in the spacey, heady mix. Lush is another word that comes to mind in some portions of the album, including “Hit the North” and the breezy “Tropic of Cancer” and the catchy sugar-coated pop of “Mr. Wilson”. But the longer the album goes, the odder it becomes, with “Nine on a Side” falling off the rails quickly as does “New Madrid, 1811” that hits a wall.

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Originally from Cape Breton, MacNeil is currently writing for the Toronto Sun as well as other publications, including All Music Guide, Billboard.com, NME.com, Country Standard Time, Skope Magazine, Chart Magazine, Glide, Ft. Myers Magazine and Celtic Heritage. A graduate of the University of King's College, MacNeil currently resides in Toronto. He has interviewed hundreds of acts ranging from Metallica and AC/DC to Daniel Lanois and Smokey Robinson. MacNeil (modestly referred to as King J to friends), a diehard Philadelphia Flyers fan, has seen the Rolling Stones in a club setting, thereby knowing he will rest in peace at some point down the road. Oh, and he writes for PopMatters.com.


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Ideal Free Distribution - New Madrid, 1811
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