Morning Glory

Two Suns Worth

by Alan Brown

8 January 2008

 

A seemingly endless tidal wave of groups swept along the Californian coast in the wake of Jefferson Airplane in the late ‘60s and Morning Glory is one of the more noteworthy bands who lived in the shadow of the great “White Rabbit”. The band cut their one and only record in May 1968. Produced by Abe “Voco” Kesh (best known for his work with Bay Area psychedelic rockers Blue Cheer) and engineered by John Cale, Two Suns Worth is now finally released on CD. The album is a solid, tightly arranged set of lysergic love which puts the stereo effect to head-swimming use while combining barrelhouse psych-organ, upfront drum fills and female-male harmonies, to ensure that trippy vibe keeps you guessing. And numbers as good as the haunting, Eastern-influenced psych-folk melancholia of “Jelly Gas Flame” and the dreamy pop of the harpsichord-led “I See a Light” ensure that this is one obscure vinyl artifact which is actually worth digging up.

Two Suns Worth

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