Num9

The Glow-worms Resistance

by Deanne Sole

25 March 2007

 

The CD they describe in the press kit sounds lovely. I quote: “Equipped with a computer, electric guitars, Spanish guitars, synthesisers of all shapes and sizes and his voice, he [Coque Yturriaga, ex-Migala guitarist] opens a door revealing syncopated beats and heady rhythms. ... Created with a freshness and an immediacy unheard of in the panorama of independent music in Spain, it ... arrives at a unique place ... [a] disturbing, melancholic and euphoric world.” Do you see what I mean when I say it sounds lovely? A euphoric world! I like euphoric worlds. Fresh and immediate? Nice. But then I put on the album and the beats sound muddy, the rhythm seems too subdued and undernourished to be heady, and the darkness of the music is not disturbing, it’s more like an underlit swamp. Partly this muddiness comes from Yturriaga’s voice, which is thin, unemphatic, and too uncertain for melancholy or euphoria. I read the press kit and then listen to the CD and feel as if I’m missing something. Any ideas?

The Glow-Worm's Resistance

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