Partyline

Zombie Terrorist

by Joe Tacopino

4 March 2007

 

Partyline put themselves in the genre of “spunk”—a combination of punk rock and pop music. Their simplistic Ramones-style riffs and brash riot grrl vocals might brand them as a less cerebral Le Tigre or three-chord Sleater-Kinney. Zombie Terrorist goes by lightning-fast as the band uses one-and-a-half minute punk songs to tackle such sacred cows as George W. Bush and Christian conservatives (how original). Title track “Zombie Terrorist” actually comes from a news report about a teenage boy who was suspended when he wrote an essay about zombies taking over his high school. The band uses this rhetorical scenario to lambaste the public’s irrational anxiety in a post-9/11 fear-crazed environment. The rest of the album plays like punk rock paint-by-numbers, as we are fed one inane song after another. Hailing from Washington D.C., Partyline definitely display some of the old-school flavor that made the city a hardcore breeding ground. But Partyline’s florescent spunk rock is annoyingly repetitive and uses juvenile, rebellious lyrics to tackle overdone themes.

Zombie Terrorist

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