Poster Children

DDD

by Sarah Zupko

 

The last year has been the most prolific period of Poster Children’s long and illustrious career. Following 1999’s self-produced debut on spinART, New World Record, Poster Children assumed their instrumental alter-ego Salaryman for a splendid groovy effort on Karoshi earlier this year. Singing again, the lads offer up DDD, the first anthem album of 2000 for the indie rock crowd.

Considering they’ve barely taken a breather, DDD is an unbelievably polished and fully-conceived work. In fact, it’s not a stretch to say the workaholicism has been a boon for the band, pushing their artistic limits and stoking the fires of their creativity to new heights. “Judge Freeball” and “Peck N’ Paw” are funky instrumentals more in keeping with their Krautrock Salaryman persona than classic Poster Children, but that’s merely one element of this wildly diverse album. Sporting intense and dark, attack dog guitar, noisy rock (“Time Share”), spacey, psychedelic pop that wouldn’t be out of place on a Ride or Swervedriver album (“Strange Attractors”), and bouncy punk/pop (“Rock and Roll”), DDD is an indie rock tour de force and the best album of the band’s career.

DDD

Rating:

 

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