Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Music
cover art

Precious Fathers

Precious Fathers

(White Whale; US: 6 Sep 2005; UK: Unavailable)

This is a Vancouver band that plays instrumentals that supposedly are meant to inspire gazing at one’s shoes. The group, consisting of members of bands like Destroyer and Sparrow, sound as if they’ve been submerged in a room filled with Robert Smith posters for the strong opening “Prairie Train”, which builds over the course of five interesting and delectable minutes. The only difference is that there are some horns added, giving it a slight jazzy flavoring. Just as fine and winding is “Upset Frankie-Hustle”, which features some fine guitar work and at times bombastic flourishes. “Gallant Foot” doesn’t fare as well, and is lightweight from start to finish. Thankfully, they return to form with a busy and intricate piece entitled “Past It Pastures” and the first gem that has them on what sounds like cruise control for “Snowshoes”. The second half of the album has a few longer numbers, beginning with the down-tempo “Ant and the Pea”, a sullen, melancholic effort. The band also shines on “Get All the Ribbons and Bring Them Back Here”, a 10-minute odyssey with plenty of twists and curves.

Rating:

Originally from Cape Breton, MacNeil is currently writing for the Toronto Sun as well as other publications, including All Music Guide, Billboard.com, NME.com, Country Standard Time, Skope Magazine, Chart Magazine, Glide, Ft. Myers Magazine and Celtic Heritage. A graduate of the University of King's College, MacNeil currently resides in Toronto. He has interviewed hundreds of acts ranging from Metallica and AC/DC to Daniel Lanois and Smokey Robinson. MacNeil (modestly referred to as King J to friends), a diehard Philadelphia Flyers fan, has seen the Rolling Stones in a club setting, thereby knowing he will rest in peace at some point down the road. Oh, and he writes for PopMatters.com.


discussion by

Comments
Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.