Quintron

Too Thirsty 4 Love

by Chris Chafin

6 November 2008

 

Somewhere between performance art, organ-abusing dance music, and cartoons lie husband and wife duo Quintron and Miss Pussycat. Over about a dozen records, Quintron has been refining his raucous sound, which at first resembled the soundtrack to a feverish night of stimulant overindulgence while seated at a keyboard. Their latest album, Too Thirsty 4 Love, finds them reigning in their noisier impulses to create an uniquely enjoyable and danceable album.

Quintron’s best songs are tense affairs that seem about to careen out of control at any moment, and yet don’t quite descend into madness. “Waterfall”, a vintage synth boogie about getting blind drunk at a mini-mall, “Model Ex Citizen”, and “Freedom” all toe this line marvelously. Of course, he isn’t really interested in making every song enjoyable, or even listenable. “Sunday Night” finds him inexplicably screaming in a horrible fake British accent about a night of “drinking in the pub.” “Reborn” is a showcase for his photo-reactive drum machine, the Drum Buddy. Which is to say it sounds like a droning headache. Still, previous efforts like These Hands of Mine and Satan Is Dead are nothing but songs like these. 

cover art

Quintron

Too Thirsty 4 Love

(Goner)
US: 21 Oct 2008
UK: Unavailable

All told, Too Thirsty 4 Love marks something of an evolution for Mr. Quintron into music that leaves a listener more intrigued and happy than confused and deaf. One can only hope the record draws a few more citizens into their marvelously bizarre world.

Too Thirsty 4 Love

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