Randolph

Lonely Eden

by Andrew Martin

17 April 2008

 

Although not as initially engaging as his contemporaries, bassist/soul singer Paul Randolph proves on Lonely Eden that you don’t need to be “neo” to leave a mark in the soul world. The Detroit artist’s 58-minute sophomore album is chock full of funk and soul while his vocals are undeniably smooth and sincere. Perhaps the most difficult hump to overcome with being a soul artist is not falling into the realm of sounding generic. Luckily for Randolph, that never happens. And he succeeds in his efforts of not pigeonholing his songwriting to a certain style.

The somber and introspective “Broken (AKA Warnings)” stands up perfectly next to the song-for-the-people “Golden Days”. Even his braggadocio-track, “Leanin’”, doesn’t sound forced or over-the-top. Much of Randolph’s appeal is in his ability to layer his rich vocals over lush production as vibrant as the album’s namesake. But that’s not to say it’s over-produced. Lonely Eden only falls short on a few dragging tracks that make the album more of a grower than an addictive first listen. That being written, you’ll most likely agree with Stevie Wonder, who sang Randolph’s praises, about the magic of this record.

cover art

Randolph

Lonely Eden

(Still Music)
US: 25 Mar 2008
UK: 1 Oct 2007

Lonely Eden

Rating:

Topics: randolph
//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Blood and Thunder: Black Sabbath’s ‘Sabotage’ at 40

// Sound Affects

"In 1975, with lawyers in the studio and a financial empire crumbling, Black Sabbath fought back with their last classic album of the decade.

READ the article