Gil Scott-Heron, Evolution (and Flashback) The Very Best of Gil Scott-Heron

by Nichole Rustin

 

Chicago born and New York raised Gil Scott-Heron released his first of three albums in 1971 for Bob Thiele’s Flying Dutchman label. These three albums serve as the core for this compilation of 15 poem-songs, including “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” Whitey on the Moon,” “Small Talk at 125th and Lenox,” and “Billy Green is Dead.” Listening to Scott-Heron reminds us of the promise to keep it real that hip-hop struggles to fulfill-righteous and critical commentary in lyrical poetry and complex rhythms. “Enough,” which is the black man raising to patriarchal authority against white men, slavery, and the raping and pillaging black women, also shows us how deeply entrenched this type of sentimentality is though.

Evolution (and Flashback) the Very Best of Gil Scott-Heron

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