The Armed Forces

Modern Gospel for Modern Men & Women

by Evan Sawdey

4 March 2008

 

The Armed Forces is basically a front for egotistical frontman (and Nashville native) Brandon Jazz, a young man who is more than happy to label his group “The World’s Most Dangerous Pop Band”—when, in fact, they’re as harmless as a doe-eyed puppy dog. Jazz and co. have the retro-rock strut down, but that’s about all that they got: “Now, Now People” is a regrettable tossed off pop number that lacks any bite whatsoever, and the regrettably titled “Rock N’ Roll Nigger (Part Two)” manages to use all of its 47 seconds to annoy and do nothing more. Things fare better with the other three songs on this brief EP: “In the Free World” works as a somewhat accidental tribute to “Cleveland Rocks” crooner Ian Hunter, and “The Runaways” actually implements its retro-kitsch well, sounding like a fully-formed song amidst a sea of demos that need drastic re-writes. If you really do need some genuine flashback rock fun, then download that Foxboro Hottubs EP that Green Day put out. Otherwise, the only danger that’s actually involved with the Armed Forces is the danger of you wasting your money.

Modern Gospel for Modern Men & Women

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