The Papercuts

Cant Go Back

by Jason MacNeil

9 April 2007

 

Jason Quever’s brand of pop is timeless and oh so delightful. The album starts with the cello-tinged “Dear Employee”, which sounds like a West Coast version of Canadian band The Hidden Cameras. It’s slightly hymnal and spiritual, but still rooted in fine pop sensibilities. The songs often have a cinematic, scene-setting quality to them, especially during the “spaghetti” western hue of “John Brown” minus the Clint Eastwood stares. Here Quever changes up the homestretch up a bit, upping the tempo for a stellar conclusion. Everything touches sounds magical, even the dreary and somber “Summer Long”, which makes way for the cheerful but still melancholic and dreamy “Unavailable” that seems to float in the air. One of the sleeper picks has to be the bouncy, Dylan-esque “Take The 227th Exit”. Each song is finely crafted, especially the tender “Outside Looking In”, a cross between Tom Petty and The Rolling Stones in their country rock glory. Another bonus is that there is no filler here. “Sandy” and “Just Another Thing to Dust” sound as fabulous as the initial ditties. A terribly, terribly great album!

Can't Go Back

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