The Rosewood Thieves

Lonesome

by Aarik Danielsen

3 February 2008

 

Though possessing a little brother status in the recording world, a well-made EP can be extremely helpful in granting uninitiated listeners a glimpse into a band’s style and sound. As is the case with The Rosewood Thieves’ Lonesome , a truly exceptional EP can deliver with all the potency and poignancy of a full-length record. Though comprised of only six songs, Lonesome manages to be one of the most complete and satisfying releases of the past year. Whether delicately crafting an exquisite piece of folk music (as on instrumental opener “Poor Bonnie’s Affliction” or the gentle “Untitled #1”), gradually developing a sonic gem in the vein of Wilco (“California Moon”) or putting a fresh twist on the tried and true lyrical theme about devious women causing the ruin of poor, unsuspecting men (“Murder Ballad in G Minor”), the New York based group gives their music enough room to breathe, grow and resonate, never getting in the way. More than just a peek at the work of a band that is learning how to grow into greatness (which it is), Lonesome is a stellar release that deserves a place alongside its seemingly more substantial siblings.

Lonesome

Rating:

 

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