Woolly Leaves

Quiet Waters

by Jason MacNeil

15 April 2007

 

Woolly Leaves don’t leave much to the imagination, with a laidback, slightly tranquil roots-meets-folk feeling oozing out of “Everyone Else”. Lead singer and songwriter Will Kidman has a sincere, earnest delivery throughout many of these songs, backed by a barren background that brings the listener into this numbers quickly. This especially true on the heart-tugging live performance of “Walk With Light”. It’s as if you’re listening into a session that is oftentimes off limits judging by the lovely “People and the Planets” that recalls Luna or a duet between Caitlin Cary and Ryan Adams. Fans of Bright Eyes or a very pared down Calexico would also enjoy “Big City”, which has Kidman not quite singing the song but not speaking the lyrics either. Although there are many strong pieces, perhaps the highlight is “Neverending Song” with its airy harmonies. But despite the flighty feel, the album takes a far darker tone during “Quiet Waters”. The up-tempo moment (if one exists here) has to be the dirge-ish “Soft Place to Call Home”. It’s an album that’s difficult to get into, but quickly difficult to take from your player.

Quiet Waters

Rating:

 

We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong online. Please consider a donation to support our work as an independent publisher devoted to the arts and humanities. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing and challenging times where advertising no longer covers our costs. We need your help to keep PopMatters publishing. Thank you.

 


//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

20 Questions: Nashville Singer-Songwriter Natalie Hemby

// Sound Affects

"Natalie Hemby's Puxico is a standout debut from a songwriter who has been behind the scenes for over a decade.

READ the article