Kllo: Backwater

Kllo: Backwater

By William Sutton

Australian cousins deliver genre-fusing debut album of understated dancefloor euphoria, tinged with darker undertones of isolation and self reflection as the impact of their early successes are realised. 20 Oct 2017 // 2:30 AM

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//Recent Reviews

2 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

Jimmy Stewart by Marc Eliot

One need only turn the page to be greeted with a fresh example of Eliot's ignorance of film history and technology.

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Incognito: Bees+Things+Flowers

Bees+Things+Flowers evokes the invincible summer in listeners, irrespective of equatorial vantage point.

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2 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

Incubus: Light Grenades

Light Grenades might actually be the album that could make people stop wishing that Incubus was the band it used to be.

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2 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

Magical Starsign

The biggest crime Magical Starsign commits is the endless, relentless, incessant, infuriatingly pointless random battles.

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Various Artists: Crunk Hits Vol. 2

It's hard to be stupid in a smart way, that much easier to just be stupid.

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2 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

Rafael Toral: Space

Portuguese electronic composer (and Rhys Chatham collaborator) Rafael Toral ponders the unpredictability of synthesized sound and the emptiness of deep space in three extended pieces.

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Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont (2006)

Perhaps with some more complete supporting characters in the mix, the central story, here, might have been more palatable, but standing alone, the premise unfortunately gets boring faster than one can say "tea and crumpets".

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2 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

True Caribbean Pirates

The History Channel's rendition of 17th and 18th century pirates is a swashbuckling factual recount of their dramatic maritime stories.

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Ladyfinger (ne): Heavy Hands

Sound and fury, without enough fury.

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Houseguest: High Strangeness

Houseguest has the legs to be more than just another legendary local band, and if their association with the Black Keys gets their foot in the door, more power to them.

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More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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