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Sunday, May 9 1999

    Labradford: E luxo so

Perhaps the two most important components of creating memorable mood music are the use of restraint and a respect for silence. In other words, it


Monday, May 3 1999

Ella Fitzgerald: Cocktail Hour

Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holliday, apart from being the most important and best-known jazz singers of the last century, represent two sides of an interesting coin.


Monday, April 19 1999

    Bijou Phillips: I’d Rather Eat Glass

Bijou Phillips will forever be announced following the phrase “former model turned singer/actress” which is unfortunate—not because her modelling career spanned roughly four


Monday, August 31 1998

    Willie Nelson: Teatro

My ties to Willie Nelson were never all that evident. They barely existed, to tell you the truth. My stepfather owned a Willie Nelson greatest


Monday, March 23 1998

    Semisonic: Feeling Strangely Fine

Who would have guessed that from the frozen Minneapolis winter would come the hottest pop album of 1998? Since rising from the ashes of the classic


Monday, November 3 1997

Fold Zandura: Ultraforever

Four years ago, Fold Zandura released Ultraforever with giddy self-confidence. Buried in the liner notes was this pronouncement: “...and to everyone who thinks they’ve


Monday, September 22 1997

Emer Kenny: self-titled

I came across my favorite Irish pop music album a couple of years ago at the big tent music sale held every summer in the


Monday, March 24 1997

    New Duncan Imperials: In-A-Gadda-Da-Vegas

You know, there’s nothing better than kicking back over the weekend, specifically on a Friday night, and having a few friends up while you


Monday, January 23 1995

The Clientele: Suburban Light

Where most musicians seem content to respond and resignify, toying with mix and match flip-books, the Clientele move beyond pedigree charts and musical genealogy, eclipsing cultural context and conceptual frameworks.


Sunday, January 1 1995

‘The Camera My Mother Gave Me’

Susanna Kaysen's mission seems to be to put her life on the page. Famous for Girl, Interrupted, her autobiographical material fills volumes.


Hamlet (2000)

I confess to feeling a certain dread when I first heard that Ethan ('I have this planet of regret') Hawke was starring in Michael Almereyda's updated-and-abbreviated Hamlet.


American Diaspora: Poetry of Displacement by Virgil Suarez and Ryan G. Van Cleave

It's no surprise that an anthology of this kind ['American Diaspora: Poetry of Displacement'] would come along sooner or later, but that shouldn't take away from its merits. This book needed to happen, both for its subject matter and for its delivery (and -ance).


The Widow of Saint-Pierre (La Veuve de Saint-Pierre) (2001)

Newly married and deeply in love, the couple is known for their 'modern ideas', which means -- in the film's rather simplistic terms -- that they are willing to look beyond a man's deed and into his character. It also means that they make love often, curtains billowing in the background.


R-Point (2004)

All battlefields are haunted, alive with the spirits of those who have fallen in the name of war. It's too bad that this Korean horror film set during Vietnam decided to rely on clichéd creeps to fuel its frights.


Rear Window (1954/2000)

Rear Window's theatrical rerelease is, among other things, a showcase for mainstream moviedom's emergent special effects technologies.


The Devil and Daniel Johnston (2005)

Daniel Johnston's extensive self-documentation is sometimes eerie, as The Devil and Daniel Johnston has an abundance of material from which to cull its storyline.


Welcome to (Slightly Grubby) Heaven

The inspiration for this story came from Toby Tripp's experience working in the London Underground cleaning up the dead bodies of people who commit suicide by jumping on the tracks.


Hellboy: Box Full of Evil (1999)

I have a tendency to be impatient with gothic and Victorian subcultures. As a child I loved monster movies, loved Dracula, loved the idea of demons and haunted houses. But as I got older and watched these mythological and very old stories become subsumed into the world of role-playing games and bad rock and roll, I became bored, critical and a real scoffer.


Dori Stories: The Complete Dori Seda

At the time of her death in 1988, Dori Seda's work was widely published, having appeared in Wimmen's Comics, Weirdo, and Rip Off Comix, among others. Seda did her own one-shot comic book called Lonely Nights Comics, and was well-known in the San Francisco underground comix community, where she worked at Last Gasp, first as a janitor and eventually as their full-time bookkeeper.


Outlaw Nation

Quite simply, 'Outlaw Nation' represents the USA and while it's not evident how the analogy plays itself out at this early stage, it's clear that Delano is taking aim at the dark heart of America with this series.


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