Future: EVOL

Future: EVOL

By Brian Duricy

EVOL doesn’t stand up to Future's critical peaks, but this could easily be seen as but a release to tide fans over before the next blockbuster. 9 Feb 2016 // 2:30 AM

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//Recent Reviews
	Ticonderoga: The Heilig-Levine LP

Don't be fooled, on occasion Ticonderoga sounds like a rock band, but it's not. I don't know quite what it is, but it's not a rock band.

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30 Nov 2005 // 10:00 PM

	The Skygreen Leopards: Jehovah Surrender

A jungle of sounds and nature's call colliding in six cinematic songs most fully appreciated in their immediate environs.

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30 Nov 2005 // 10:00 PM

	Bobo Stenson: Goodbye

A modern master of jazz piano plays against the ECM clichés to create another in a series of deep trio albums, this time with Paul Motian on drums.

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	The Rakes: Capture/Release / Retreat [EP]

The Rakes' pub crawl soundtrack on the Capture/Release UK album and the Retreat US EP reveal the 'it' band hype is somewhat unfounded.

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	The Paddingtons: First Comes First

If you found this Paddington in a British train station with a polite tag attached to it, you would probably decide to leave it rather than accept it into your quaint home.

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	LD & the New Criticism: Tragic Realism

If a cathartic set of silly breakup anthems that usually result in the death of one or more parties sounds like your cup of tea, LD is here to help.

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	Bloody Hollies: If Footmen Tire You…

They plug in their guitars, take a handful of time-tested garage, surf, and blues riffs and proceed to blow out the speakers for 30 glorious minutes.

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30 Nov 2005 // 12:00 AM

Andrew Bird + Martin Dosh

A violin. A xylophone. A giant, curved phonograph horn. Looks like it's time for a concert by the Squirrel Nut Zippers' prodigal son.

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30 Nov 2005 // 12:00 AM

Channel Frederator

These intentionally underdeveloped, short-short 'toons are as well suited for inclusion in a podcast as they are poorly prepared for inclusion in any other collection.

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30 Nov 2005 // 12:00 AM

Continued by Piotr Sommer

Nearly every poem springs from/exists in the Relentlessly Everyday.

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More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media
//Blogs

In Motion: On the Emptiness of Progress

// Moving Pixels

"Nils Pihl calls it, "Newtonian engagement", that is, when "an engaged player will remain engaged until acted upon by an outside force". That's "progress".

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