Maybe What's Going on in 'Get Out' Is All in His Head

Maybe What's Going on in 'Get Out' Is All in His Head

By J.C. Macek III

This film's horror could be satire of a fish-out-of-water situation; perhaps Chris is only imagining much of what he thinks is happening, and he's just overly anxious... 23 May 2017 // 9:30 AM

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//Recent Reviews

2 Jan 2007 // 9:01 PM

Sister Hazel: Absolutely

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//Mixed media
//Blogs

Pilot X Puts a Crimp on the Business in 'The Mysterious Airman'

// Short Ends and Leader

"Mystery writer Arthur B. Reeve's influence in this film doesn't follow convention -- it follows his invention.

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