Kllo: Backwater

Kllo: Backwater

By William Sutton

Australian cousins deliver genre-fusing debut album of understated dancefloor euphoria, tinged with darker undertones of isolation and self reflection as the impact of their early successes are realised. 20 Oct 2017 // 2:30 AM

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//Mixed media
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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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