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Sunday, January 1 1995

Hearts in Atlantis (2001)

The nostalgia infusing 'Hearts in Atlantis' often makes the film infuriating, as well as just plain dopey.


The Hurricane (1999)

There's a moment partway through The Hurricane that may cause you to catch your breath. It's a cramped shot, as are most of those showing Ruben Hurricane Carter (Denzel Washington) in his New Jersey State Prison cell.


How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000)

Early in Ron Howard’s much anticipated live-action version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas, while all of Who-ville is a-bustle with holiday shopping fever,


Half Past Autumn: The Life and Works of Gordon Parks (2000)

Gordon Parks' hollering is, of course, far from the usual. Elegant and intelligent, poignant and political, Parks' art encompasses a remarkable range of subjects and forms.


Holy Smoke (1999)

In Holy Smoke, Australian writer-director Jane Campion returns to a familiar theme. Once again, she’s looking at a strong-willed, unconventional woman who is at


A Hard Day’s Night (1964/2000)

A smooth amalgamation of Richard Lester's intricate direction, Alun Owen's hysterical screenplay, and the natural charms of John, Paul, George, and Ringo, 'A Hard Day's Night' is a film perfectly of its time and perfectly timeless.


Gone in 60 Seconds (2000)

Contrary to its titular promise of speed speed speed, this latest Jerry Bruckheimer actioner takes pretty much forever to get to its wholly predictable and


Ghost World (2001)

'Ghost World' is smart, sensitive, and insightful about the lunacy that constitutes adolescence, and never forgets how real and how complicated kids' feelings are.


Gossip (2000)

As metaphor, the film's extreme look, its architecture, camera angles, weather -- externalizes the characters' extreme emotional (and occasionally mental) states.


The Green Mile (1999)

ound dogs baying, wildflowers bending to the wind, angry white men in shirt-sleeves carrying shotguns, a swatch of cloth clinging to a tree branch. The details are all a little too familiar. You know you're looking at yet another recreation of the scary Old American South, specifically, you're looking at the set up for a lynching. This first scene of Frank Darabont's The Green Mile...


Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (2000)

Jim Jarmusch’s new feature, Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai, is much like other Jim Jarmusch films: the pace is slightly slow, the


Gladiator (2000)

They don’t make movies like they used to. But then again, why would they? Gladiator claims to be a return to the days of


Glitter (2001)

The film's depiction of an ecstatic New York City might be its only strength.


The Golden Bowl (2000)

Adam (Nick Nolte) is introduced on screen with the title, 'America's First Billionaire' (this is the level of overstatement to which the film resorts repeatedly, not trusting its audience to follow even the simplest plot points).


Gimme Shelter (1970/2000)

Sixties rock and roll festivals -- given their large crowds of people, lack of sanitary facilities, bad drugs, and shortages of food and water -- were catastrophes waiting to happen. People get angry when they're uncomfortable or feel ripped off.


Get Real (1999)

Based on Patrick Wilde’s play, What’s Wrong With Angry?, and directed by Simon Shore, this 1998 high school movie tenders the usual mix of


Groove (2000)

Strong devotees of any “subculture” (for lack of a better word) are usually involved for a reason. The scene might appeal to them in spiritually


Goya in Bordeaux (2000)

While 'Goya in Bordeaux' should be applauded for breaking from the stale conventions of narrative and image in cinematic biography, it does so in a manner that garbles meaning and smacks of 'art for art's sake.'"


The General’s Daughter (1999)

The title character in The General's Daughter is dead. The image gets your attention. It's grotesque and horrifying. And it's recalled several times in the film, verbally and visually, to impress on you the threat that it supposedly poses for military, moral, sexual, and aesthetic orders.


Genghis Blues (2000)

Paul Pena is unlike anyone you’ve ever known. The son of West African immigrants, he’s living in San Francisco, a blind and brilliant


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