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Sunday, January 1 1995

Diamonds (2000)

Most of the action in Diamonds involves a road trip undertaken by Harry Agensky (Kirk Douglas), his son Lance (Dan Aykroyd), and grandson Michael (Corbin Allred).


The Dish (2001)

Cliff, Mitch, and the adorably timid Glenn spend great dollops of screen time trying to recompute Apollo 11's trajectory, covering a blackboard with an engineer's esoteric, mathematical scrawl.


Dinosaur (2000)

The movie certainly doesn't devote much screen time to the dinosaurs' long-term fate, instead being content to follow along as Aladar tries to get laid without getting eaten -- you know, the way we all do.


The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972/2000)

The utopian vision Bunuel and his contemporaries aspired to is now beside the point. All that is necessary is to get us to remember a product in order to consume it.


Duets (2000)

Duets exposes the frustration of the 'American Dream', when working hard only makes you tired.


Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo (1999)

With Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo, however, Schneider finally manages to thrust his unattractive mug into the spotlight. The result is a comic spoof that casts him as the anti-Richard Gere, an ill-suited suitor whose on-the-job training provides for a variety of awkwar


Daniel Takes a Train (Szerencsés Dániel) (1983/2001)

The Hungarian film, 'Daniel Takes a Train', explores at length the tensions and sorrows that befall the lives of political refugees and details how those lives persist, even in the grim face of war.


Djomeh (2000)

Hassan Yektapanah's 'Djomeh' is perhaps the strangest and most rewarding romance you'll see all year.


The Deep End (2001)

PULL"


Domestic Disturbance (2001)

Domestic Disturbance goes through the motions, slowly at first, and then with a speed that would seem remarkable if you cared a whit what was going on.


Deterrence (1998)

Deterrence, Rod Lurie's directorial debut, two years in the works, repeats the many overworked cliches of the nuclear paranoia pics of the early '80s, but comes nowhere near the achievement of kiddie classics like War Games, Fail Safe, The Longest Day, or even the melodramatic made-for-TV event, The Day After.


Dinner Rush (2001)

What is it about food movies that makes critics and arthouse audiences drool?.


Down to Earth (2001)

And so, here comes Mr. Rock, invading the white folks' world with something approximating a vengeance.


Double Jeopardy (1999)

There's something satisfying about watching a beleaguered woman get revenge on a lowdown-scumsucker of a husband. True, there's also something satisfying about substantive characters and plots without whopping big holes in them. But you can't have everything.


Dr. T & The Women (2000)

We're stuck, 'Dr. T & The Women' seems to say. Men and women: this is simply how we are.


Do the Right Thing (1989/2001)

For someone like me, who grew up with a VCR perpetually blinking 12:00 under my TV set, it’s difficult to imagine what it must have


Donnie Darko (2001)

PULL.


District B13 (2004)

Pierre Morel's film maintains a healthy tension, as Damien believes in 'the law' and Leïto is never convinced of its efficacy or good intentions.


Dancer in the Dark (2000)

It seems only a film as schizophrenic as 'Dancer in the Dark' would suit Björk, what with its melancholic moments of quiet and curious explosions of sound.


Dungeons & Dragons (2000)

With all this avowed dedication to D&D, its values and ethics, its alternative vision of a utopic world, and all the time it took Courtney Solomon to secure funding for the film, you would think he could have come up with a much better movie than the one we see here.


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