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Reviews

Sunday, January 1 1995

Bridget Jones’s Diary (2001)

In her diary, Bridget Jones is a star.


The Brothers (2001)

Facing his boys on the basketball court, where they go to sweat, score, and hash out their 'stuff', Terry (Shemar Moore) argues -- none too convincingly -- that his settling down is a sign of his maturity. The others are unconvinced. And so they go on to talk about it. A lot.


Beautiful (2000)

Using the subculture of U.S. beauty pageants as a base, Beautiful addresses a multitude of apparently “female” issues. It brings up self-image problems, objectification,


The Body (2001)

... examines the threat science poses to organized religion.


Bootmen (2000)

In lieu of making a strong pro-labor statement, 'Bootmen' focuses on asserting that these dancers are not pansies.


Big Trouble in Little China (1986/2001)

Jack Burton (Kurt Russell) is the anti-hunk, the inverse of the pectorally endowed fighting machines typified by Stallone and Schwarzenegger.


A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind idealizes mental illness as spectacle, a feel-good gladiatorial games of the psyche where the human spirits always triumphs and love always blooms.


Bring It On (2000)

Now this is a surprise: Bring It On is, at some not-quite-invisible sublevel, about white thievery of black cultural forms and content.


Black Knight (2001)

PULL.


Blair Witch 2: Book of Shadows (2000)

As the Blair Witch has her way with the group one by one, 'BW2' turns partly cheesy and nonsensical like a slasher film and partly, like 'BW1', emotional and visceral, with disquieting depictions of grisly violence.


The Blair Witch Project (1999)

Warning: The following review contains minor plot spoilers. “It’s hard to get lost in America, and it’s even harder to stay lost.” Heather


Beyond the Mat (1999)

'Who are these guys?' a voice asks, as the screen is filled with successive images of men, some bloody and all wearing tights, beating one another senseless.


Boys Don’t Cry (1999)

As the charismatic protagonist in Kimberly Peirce's Boys Don't Cry, Brandon embodies the ongoing dilemma of masculine identity. This dilemma is exacerbated by the fact that, when you see him riding that pickup truck, some fifteen minutes into the film, you already know that 18-year-old Brandon's efforts to act like a boy are complicated by the fact that he is, biologically speaking, a girl, born Teena Brandon.


Butterfly (Lengua de las mariposas, La) (1999)

Jose Luis Cuerda's film, Butterfly, mourns the Spain destroyed by civil conflict by remembering it through the enchanted eyes of a small boy.


Brokedown Palace (1999)

High school movies tend to end with graduation. It's at the prom that the primary couple finally achieves their much-anticipated clinch (with camera circling and trendy pop song resounding) while their adversaries - treacherous teachers, jealous fellow students, ridiculous parents - back off or smile approvingly, showing that they have indeed learned whatever lessons they're supposed to have learned.


Bride of the Wind (2001)

[In 'Bride of the Wind',] Alma agrees to marry Mahler even when he demands that she give up her own piddly composing and adopt his music as 'our music.' This suggests he's a jealous, possessive, and petty fellow, but that is for us to surmise and for her to deal with in later scenes.


The Bone Collector (1999)

The Bone Collector assumes you know the drill, the serial-killer-movie drill. It gives you most everything you need to know during the first four minutes, half of which take up the credits sequence (the credits themselves are, of course, hyper-scratchy and slashy-looking, very post-Seven stylish).


Big Momma’s House (2000)

But of course, all this genderfuck is just warm-up for Malcolm/Big Momma's dilemmas when it comes to sex.


Bedazzled (2000)

The fact that all of Elliot's hopes and dreams are pinned on winning Allison supplies the film's most provocative gender twist -- a man refashioning himself to please a woman.


Blue Streak (1999)

Martin Lawrence's signature punchline is all about survival. Typically delivered with exuberance and not a little self-satisfaction, the line reflects his thrill at getting over. It reflects his fans' thrill as well: they're happy to see their boy survive and, even better, succeed.


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