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Reviews

Sunday, January 1 1995

The Black & White Book by R.P. Moore

'And what greater contrast is there than placing self-indulgent hatred and disgust right beside profound love and understanding?' R.P. Moore shows us both sides of ourselves in a unique way, in a book destined to become a classic.


Batman Unmasked: Analysing a Cultural Icon by Will Brooker

. . . the main thrust of his study argued to allow a queer reading of the hero's adventures.


The Blue Guide to Indiana by Michael Martone

...a pleasant diversion if deadpan satire is your thing.


Birth of the Cool - Beat, Bebop and the American Avant Garde by Lewis MacAdams

When saxman Charlie Parker visited Paris in 1949, he was introduced to Jean-Paul Sartre, one of the godfathers of existential thought. 'I'm very glad to have met you,' the musician told the philosopher. 'I like your playing very much.'"


The Beforelife by Franz Wright

We have the art itself, but we also have the honest, unflinching gaze into his own fear, his own darkness, and it is this gaze that makes it hard not to empathize with him: here is a man who can make art out of his own shadow.


Black Superheroes, Milestone Comics, and Their Fans by Jeffrey A. Brown

A review and and an interview with Jeffrey A. Brown: 'Where there seems to be a lack [of serious study] is on the positive side of the mainstream comics. . . you get the sense that it's sort of apologetic or subliterate.'"


The Birds of Heaven: Travels With Cranes by Peter Matthiessen

A glimpse of those long months of freezing and sweltering, studying and contemplating, in the field by an observer who has done it with sensitive dedication.


The Beatles Diary by Barry Miles

My advice would be stick with Volume 1 if you're anything but a Beatlemaniac.


The Bill Monroe Reader by Tom Ewing

To become a legitimate icon - Bill Monroe's real though unconfessed motivation - it was crucial that he become the messiah of a morally wholesome movement, upholding an idea of conduct that he was unable to attain in a few of his personal dealings.


PopMatters - Books - Reviews

I’m highly cynical these days whenever I see an academic book on the body or sex. The body is “hot” in academic circles and


The Animator’s Survival Kit by Richard Williams

He has an honest passion about good animation: the classics such as Disney with its inventiveness and grace, Warner Bros. and Tex Avery and their inspired zaniness, while he also revels in the mind-blowing effects that can be achieved through the use of computers, eager to be witness to the next step in the evolution of animated films.


After Dachau by Daniel Quinn

As readers we hope for the happy ending, the one where the power of such art and thought once again foments radical societal change. Quinn, however, is a realist. He knows that most revolutions take time.


The Angle Quickest for Flight by Steven Kotler

The human mind loves making connections, sometimes organizing unlike data into nicely formed packets of sanity, other times tying ribbons upon packages of mayhem. Our minds also seem to search for the convenient shortcut, the Northwest Passage, the 'easy way out'. More often than not these packets and shortcuts lead to dead-ends, or mine fields laden with an ordinance of insanity and confusion.


Ambling into History: The Unlikely Odyssey of George W. Bush by Frank Bruni

Bruni's description of Bush paints a fragmented character who 'struck different poses at different times': the average student with a quick temper, prone to too much drinking and partying, who years later summoned enough ambition to win the race for governor of Texas, and whose loyalties lay with his family, pets, his beloved Texas ranch, baseball, and a slew of devoted friends who painstakingly championed his cause.


Angelina Jolie by Kathleen Tracy

PULL.


Aunt Rachel’s Fur by Raymond Federman

[Raymond Federman's] techniques seem to bring into question the 'truth' of the story . . . as well as allowing a lengthy discussion throughout the novel about the act of writing itself.


Anarchy! An Anthology of Emma Goldman’s Mother Earth by Peter Glassgold

The story offered here is not just a depiction of idealists trying to change the world, but a convincing portrait of government repression in the United States, one which should not only enlighten readers about our country's past but make them look closer at the present.


Atom by Steve Aylett

Aylett's imagination is about as creative as anyone's in the business, and his ideas are fresh and full of potential. If only he had developed his characters and his story beyond the level of a cartoon, and toned down the smug, smart-ass prose, this book could have gone somewhere.


Adios Muchachos by Daniel Chavarría

Place 'Adios Muchachos' alongside the work of John D. MacDonald, Carl Hiassen, and a good deal of Elmore Leonard, and it'll fit right in with those masters of incongruously sunny, quirky capers.


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