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Sunday, January 1 1995

The General’s Daughter (1999)

The title character in The General's Daughter is dead. The image gets your attention. It's grotesque and horrifying. And it's recalled several times in the film, verbally and visually, to impress on you the threat that it supposedly poses for military, moral, sexual, and aesthetic orders.


Genghis Blues (2000)

Paul Pena is unlike anyone you’ve ever known. The son of West African immigrants, he’s living in San Francisco, a blind and brilliant


Girl, Interrupted (1999)

What is it that makes girls in trouble so interesting? Think about all the novels, memoirs, biographies, songs, movies of the week, TV shows, and


Galaxy Quest (1999)

In the guise of a spoof of Star Trek, Dean Parisot's cheesy and pleasurable Galaxy Quest delves deeply into the social relation known as fandom. What, the film seems to ask, is a fan?"


Ghosts of Mars (2001)

In 'Ghosts of Mars', Desolation is a perfect candidate to ensure the human-humans' survival: not only is he the resilient and brilliant Ice Cube, but he is also the consummate delinquent champion.


Ginger Snaps (2001)

Ginger Snaps incorporates two classic B-movie plots: the “I was a teenage werewolf” story and the Heathers-style, high school revenge fantasy. A blackly funny bloodbath,


Galaxy Quest (1999)

Robert Zemeckis's Contact (1997) is without a doubt the finest movie in recent memory to deal with the question of what might be happening to all those rays of media dreck - TV shows, radio programs, and the like - we've been beaming higgledy-piggledy through the cosmos for the last century. Galaxy Quest is almost as certainly the second-finest such recent film, but come to think of it, I can't really recall a third, offhand, so I suppose this might constitute a less-than-ringing endorsement.


The Girl on the Bridge (1999)

This is a playful film that does not ask the viewer for sustained reflection, but rather, to take delight in the images on the screen. Hey, I've always been a sucker for those Robert Doisneau pictures.


The Green Mile (1999)

It's not news to anyone that Steven King screen adaptations get tossed into two categories: absolute crap (Maximum Overdrive, Cujo, Pet Cemetery, et. al.) and important American cinema (Stanley Kubrick's The Shining and Frank Darabont's previous King adaptation, The Shawshank Redemption).


Gosford Park (2001)

It is clear about what it is, a study of affect that is also affected.


The Gift (2000)

Sam Raimi's new scary movie isn't nearly scary enough.


The Glass House (2001)

'The Glass House' can't manage its own metaphors, and ends up tripping all over itself in order to give them a coherent context.


Girlfight (2000)

Karyn Kusama's debut feature takes you along this road with Diana slowly and carefully, showing you her body, her character, her hope, her possibility -- as she builds it, with bruises and setbacks along the way.


Godzilla 2000 (2000)

For all of Godzilla 2000's noisy, confused symbolism, its central message is as clear and simple as it was when the series first got underway: what's inside can kill.


From Hell (2001)

The real subject is the street, or rather, the street as a cultural concept, simultaneously brutal and beautiful.


Felicia’s Journey (1999)

“Don’t let it go too far,” the Felicia of this film’s title is advised, as she searches for the father of her unborn


Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (2001)

The invasion is not from without, per se, but from, and, as Ripley noted so insightfully in 'Alien 3', 'It's a metaphor.' And when 'Final Fantasy' pauses to engage this question, most notably in Aki's dreams, it's onto something.


Felicia’s Journey (1999)

The Canadian-based filmmaker Atom Egoyan has taken a different approach to the serial killer in his new film, Felicia's Journey. There's not much here that you would call sensational, no decapitated corpses, no flayed flesh, no nymphets taking ominous phone calls. Rather, the movie follows two characters, neither particularly introspective or self-aware, and both feeling nostalgia for what never was.


Fantasia 2000 (2000) - PopMatters Film Review )

With IMAX, the medium is at least half the message, as watching the “Welcome to the IMAX Experience” montage at the beginning of each IMAX


Final Destination (2000)

Everything about Final Destination probably looks demented, if not downright silly. If you've seen the trailers playing for a couple of weeks now on youth-oriented TV, you will have seen the lame plot (a kid keeps his friends off a plane flight doomed to explode), ooky wind and thunder effects, the sweaty-faced and way too pale teens, and most effectively, Tony Todd's ominous rasp, 'You can't cheat death!'"


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