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Sunday, January 1 1995

Washington by Meg Greenfield

'Washington' dissects the media, the politician, 'the policy dingdongs on the seventh floor' and the social elite. No weasel words here. Meg Greenfield never dulls her scalpel while dissecting the town and its inhabitants.


The Wind Done Gone by Alice Randall

Depending on whom you ask, Nashville author Alice Randall's novel - a pseudo diary, really, of Scarlett O'Hara's mulatto half-sister, Cynara - is a parody of 'Gone With the Wind', a sacrilegious retelling of a literary classic or a revisionist history of a vastly overrated, racist melodrama.


Who Do We Think We Are? Imagining the New Britain - PopMatters - Books - Reviews

dana”>“Progressive ideas that are ... appropriate at one historical moment, can, in time, fade and decay or become defensive in the face of further progress.


Vertical Margins: Mountaineering and the Landscapes of Neoimperialism by Reuben Ellis

In the face of globalization, our pleasures are activities laden with economic and political meaning that encourage us to 'seek out connections between culture and empire, geography and literature'.


Vampire Vow by Michael Schiefelbein

What the reader finds in 'Vampire Vow' is slightly less than what we're promised, or at least what we should expect. Have we reached an era of social ease and acceptance where a novel about a gay vampire in love with Jesus can be read at face value alone?"


The Unfinished Revolution: Human-Centered Computers and What They Can Do For Us by Michael Dertouzos

In Dertouzos' world, we'd probably end up floating in jugs of protein bath all our lives, like in 'The Matrix', and our Palm Pilots will go out to wash the SUVs we never drive and order more frozen peas for the homes we live in.


Under the Mink by Lisa E. Davis

We are all about to embark into the dark underbelly of 1950's New York, a place where the 'straight' and 'proper' big-wigs have more to hide and infinitely much more to be ashamed of - are more 'closeted' - than the marginalized gay community...


The Twentieth Wife: A Novel by Indu Sundaresan

Islam is the backdrop of this story. But, while it is ever present, it is never 'more' than a backdrop which is something of a disappointment since in this day, anything that would offer us a clearer view of Islam would be welcomed.


Ten Years of Terror. British Horror Films of the 1970s by Harvey Fenton and David Flint

The contributors examine the 133 pictures produced during the course of this decade with neither a jaundiced eye nor the kind of slavish affection for the gruesome that makes much of the writing on horror films juvenile in the extreme.


Twentieth Century America:  A Brief History by Thomas C. Reeves

Living in a contemporary world and writing about its complex history is a little like operating a weapon of sorts. Whichever way you hold it, you're aiming.


The Televisionary Oracle by Rob Brezsny

By the time 'The Televisionary Oracle' comes to an inevitable end, the reader is hooked into the un-sanity of our own world and the comparable sanity of kookdom.


To Repel Ghosts by Kevin Young

Kevin Young has produced something important here, an evocative and provocative examination of art, music, pop culture, and what it means to be -- to use the overworked but inescapable phrase -- young, gifted, and black.


Torching the Fink Books & Other Essays on Vernacular Culture by Archie Green

[Archie Green] embodies the best kind of common sense; reading him, we are alerted, as if from deep slumber, to how labor and culture, the active and the contemplative life, are not divisible territories but part of a complex environment in which thought and action form an indissoluble whole. Archie is, if anything, a agitator of the human spirit.


Tomorrow Never Knows: Rock and Psychedelics in the 1960s by Nick Bromell

Listening to the music of the times permits one to remember, Bromell believes, the loneliness, the breakthroughs, the vertigo of radicalization, and the awareness of a fundamental instability that looked like ecstasy at one moment, like evil the next.


This Is Not a Novel by David Markson

The book presents an interesting collage of the history of art and literature, peppered with artistic and literary obituaries like 'Tennessee Williams choked to death on the plastic cap of a nasal spray'.


Time Traveler and In Search of Life

One way to value nature is to examine what it would cost to replace the free goods it gives us with manufactured goods. For example, in the South 'maw nature' gave us lots of free water. With urbanization, water is no longer free.


Theremin: Ether Music and Espionage by Albert Glinsky

To most Americans, the name of Leon Theremin brings to mind the musical instrument bearing his name. To his native Russia, though, Lev Sergeyevich Termen was literally a character who spanned the history of the Soviet Union, from the original Bolshevik Revolution to the collapse of the USSR.


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