CFP: The Legacy of Radiohead's 'The Bends' 20 Years On [Deadlines: 29 Jan / 12 Feb]

Reviews

Sunday, January 1 1995

Aunt Rachel’s Fur by Raymond Federman

[Raymond Federman's] techniques seem to bring into question the 'truth' of the story . . . as well as allowing a lengthy discussion throughout the novel about the act of writing itself.


Anarchy! An Anthology of Emma Goldman’s Mother Earth by Peter Glassgold

The story offered here is not just a depiction of idealists trying to change the world, but a convincing portrait of government repression in the United States, one which should not only enlighten readers about our country's past but make them look closer at the present.


Atom by Steve Aylett

Aylett's imagination is about as creative as anyone's in the business, and his ideas are fresh and full of potential. If only he had developed his characters and his story beyond the level of a cartoon, and toned down the smug, smart-ass prose, this book could have gone somewhere.


Adios Muchachos by Daniel Chavarría

Place 'Adios Muchachos' alongside the work of John D. MacDonald, Carl Hiassen, and a good deal of Elmore Leonard, and it'll fit right in with those masters of incongruously sunny, quirky capers.


All Tomorrow’s Parties

So, there I am, re-reading for the umpteenth time one of my favorite books of all time (Neuromancer) by one of my favorite authors of


American Gods by Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman has fashioned a new myth about modern Americans, a plot constructed of fragments of ancient tales woven into an original and vital drama... 'American Gods' is both complex enough to warrant serious critical analysis, yet with a stylistic simplicity and lightning-fast pace that will engross any reader.


Among the Bears:  Raising Orphan Cubs in the Wild by Benjamin Kilham and Ed Gray

The more new suburbanites and recreators understand the critters they share the world with, the better off all will be, humans and wild things alike. But armed with little more biology than what was required to get into medical school and Disney's disgusting diet of pabulum romanticism, educating the new suburbanite is an up hill battle.


American Muslims: The New Generation by Asma Gull Hasan

It is a persuasive argument, an essay of sorts, explaining the fundamental compatibility of Islamic beliefs with those of Christianity.


The Anime Encyclopedia, A Guide to Japanese Animation Since 1917 by Jonathan Clements and Helen McCa

Then there's the one about the teenagers who get involved in corruption on a grand scale when one of them is slipped a computer disk in a Shinjuku club by someone whose life is just about to be terminated.


Americana and Other Poems by John Updike

Updike's writing and vocabulary place him in rarified air with few peers. In verse, that talent and intellect are featured in what is perhaps their best arena, a place where his razor sharp wit, keen observational eye, and precise writing shine the brightest.


Zoolander (2001)

Zoolander's parody of the fashion industry is a pretty pointless endeavor, for the simple fact that ultimately, it parodies itself.


Y Tu Mamá También (2002)

Y Tu Mamá También is all about how we shape the details of living, despite and because of this risk.


Yi Yi (A One and a Two) (2000)

With 'Yi Yi', Edward Yang accomplishes what so few films (U.S.-made, in particular) even strive to do: present an earnest depiction of familial relations.


You Can Count on Me (2000)

In fact, when Terry describes Scottsville as a town full of 'dull, narrow people... with no perspective, no scope,' he might have been describing the film's characters.


The Yards (2000)

In 'The Yards', Mark Wahlberg again plays an emotionally damaged young tough, but this time his entire environment is orchestrated to reflect that character, dark, sad, and heavy with non-options.


Xiu Xiu, the Sent Down Girl (1999)

Boys and girls are dressed alike, singing in unison, sitting rapt before a movie screen that shows glorious war footage, the triumph of good over evil. These early images in Joan Chen's debut feature, Xiu Xiu, the Sent Down Girl, set the scene i


X-Men (2000)

Beware the genesis of a new movie franchise, namely, X-Men, adapted from the best-selling comic book series of all time. Comics aficionados have been awaiting


X (1996/2001)

X's whole theology -- to the extent it can be deciphered -- is airlessly pessimistic.


What Planet Are You From? (2000)

There are great films; some of them win Oscars. There are truly bad films; some of them attract cult followings. Then there are mediocre films.


What’s the Worst That Could Happen? (2001)

Martin Lawrence and Danny DeVito are doing that non-mating mating dance that buddy characters tend to do, with too much spastic energy and not nearly enough inspiration.


Now on PopMatters
Announcements
PM Picks

© 1999-2015 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.