David Bowie: Who Can I Be Now? (1974/1976)

David Bowie: Who Can I Be Now? (1974/1976)

By Chris Gerard

The second in the lavish series of box sets surveying David Bowie's career contains some essential classics, but is stretched a little thin and has some disappointing omissions. 29 Sep 2016 // 2:30 AM

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//Recent Reviews

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Unexpected Deaths and Hideous Trousers in 'Kamikaze 89'

// Short Ends and Leader

"Rainer Werner Fassbinder is the whole show.

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