Call for Music Writers... Rock, Indie, Urban, Electronic, Americana, Metal, World and More

Reviews

Sunday, January 1 1995

Charlie’s Angels (2000)

More often than not, when transforming a once-popular TV series into a movie, filmmakers try to update the style, pace, and attitude of the original


The Cider House Rules (1999)

Set in the 1930s and '40s, The Cider House Rules has a typically Irving-ian sense of scatter: the years sort of drift by, characters are sundry, and themes are vaguely related to each other. It could be that the film is concerned with the chronically troubled relations between parents (or their substitutes) and children...


Corky Romano (2001)

'Corky Romano' is a limp, set 'em up and knock 'em down barrage of hijinx and horseshit that proves definitively that Chris Kattan's shtick is barely big enough to carry a 90-second trailer, let alone a 90-minute movie.


Chopper (2000)

It's a confrontational, if manipulative, style, never offering excuses for Chopper's behaviour. There's no obligatory flashback to an unfavourable childhood. There's no real evidence of the influence of drugs. He is who is because he is. That's it.


Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)

The film's narrative unfolds slowly -- too slowly at first.


Chunhyang (2000)

Renowned Korean director Im Kwon-taek presents a traditional Korean legend in Pansori (solo opera) style, in which a singer (Cho Sang-hyun), accompanied by a drummer (Kim Myung-hwan), sings the story of a forbidden love set in 18th-century Korea, between Mongyong Lee (Cho Seung-woo) and Chunhyang (Yi Hyo-jeong).


Cast Away (2000)

Cast Away, the new movie directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Tom Hanks, follows the life of Chuck Noland (Hanks), an over-achieving efficiency expert for


Cutter’s Way (1981/2001)

Passer expertly laces this compelling character study with all the intrigue and narrative complications familiar from classic 'film noir' of the 1940s and '50s.


The Cell (2000)

Feel-good movie? Yes, this good old-fashioned serial killer/slasher flick should send everybody home feeling good about U.S. culture and about human nature. If


Company Man (2001)

Coming on the heels of Thirteen Days, Company Man is the latest look at the troubled relationship between the United States and Cuba. Whereas trailers


Citizen Kane (Special Edition) (1941/2001)

PULL.


Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)

One doesn't need a Kung Fu Cinema background to enjoy 'Crouching Tiger', but it helps in appreciating how the movie builds on -- and arguably surpasses -- that rich cinematic tradition.


Charlie’s Angels (2000)

You haven’t lived until you’ve seen Drew Barrymore moonwalking to “Billie Jean.” This isn’t to say that you absolutely need to run


Center Stage (2000)

Near the end of Nicholas Hytner’s ballet dancers-in-love film Center Stage, up-and-coming dancer and star of her class Maureen Cummings (Susan May Pratt) finally


Chuck & Buck (2000)

If this film only accomplishes one thing, it's this: acknowledging that even straight boys explore their sexuality with their male friends and come out of the experience more aware of themselves, not necessarily fucked up.


Convergence (released as Premonition) (2001)

It's clear that we are supposed to be blown away by the cosmic wonder of it all, but I'm afraid my sense of cosmic wonder gave way to an incoherent gargle of rage: after ninety minutes of non-plot, non-character-development, and non-action, the payoff is a single piece of non-exposition.


The Caveman’s Valentine (2001)

Despite and sometimes because of its unevenness, the film conveys the delusions of daily existence with fierce poetry.


The Circle (Dayereh) (2001)

The effectiveness of 'The Circle' lies in its attention to details -- it shows what it feels like to be watched, to be afraid, to be angry and to be disappointed, all the time.


The Corruptor (1999)

'You don't change Chinatown. Chinatown changes you.' So warns Detective Nick Chen (Chow Yun Fat), upon meeting his squeaky clean newbie partner, Danny Wallace (Mark Wahlberg) in The Corruptor. And so persists the myth of Chinatown. Alluring, strange, and always inscrutable, in the movies it remains an uncrackable bastion of Otherness.


Chicken Run (2000)

I remember reading somewhere that in animation, the key to “humanizing” animals — above and beyond merely anthropomorphizing them — is to give them human eyes, big,


Now on PopMatters
Announcements
PM Picks

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.