'The Poetry of Pop' Takes a Scholarly Look at Lyrics Both Profound and Vapid

'The Poetry of Pop' Takes a Scholarly Look at Lyrics Both Profound and Vapid

By Jordan Blum

The Poetry of Pop is a testament to the power, craftsmanship, and worthwhile intent of even the most ostensibly thin tunes. 22 Aug 2017 // 9:30 AM

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//Recent Reviews

2 Jun 2006 // 12:00 AM

Rammstein: Rosenrot

Rammstein's musically rich fifth album is nowhere near as chilly as the cover art would indicate.

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2 Jun 2006 // 12:00 AM

Islands: Return to the Sea

As long as Islands keep treating us to these complex, appealing songs, we'll continue to respond more than positively.

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2 Jun 2006 // 12:00 AM

Jagged Edge: Jagged Edge

While the Jagged Edge guys unquestionably have the pipes necessary for the task, their material is sorely lacking. This is an album best left on the record store shelf.

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Mountain Con: Sancho Panza

What does the future of rock music sound like? According to these guys, it sounds a lot like Beck.

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Various artists: Gloryland: 30 Bluegrass Gospel Classics

Rebel Records' testament to recording the bluegrass gospel revelation, from its inception to the present day.

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1 Jun 2006 // 4:00 PM

The Carl Palmer Band

Bands like Tool and the Flaming Lips are reviving elements of prog -- not to mention the (ugly) platform shoes -- so why not bring back the big boys?

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1 Jun 2006 // 4:00 PM

The Break-Up (2006)

For all that goes wrong with The Break-Up, the most compelling question it raises has to do with the state of the romantic comedy.

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1 Jun 2006 // 1:00 AM

Who would think the minds behind White Chicks would be the ones to finally strike comedy gold, and in comic book form no less?

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1 Jun 2006 // 1:00 AM

Tool

's new gimmicks are mildly amusing, they indicate that the band is trying to de-emphasize its personal peculiarity. Why the hell would it want to do that?

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The Greenlanders by Jane Smiley

The historian's customary irony is replaced with the assumed fatalism of the Norse themselves, for whom death was a harsh fact of daily existence. The effect is monumental, and carries the burnished authenticity of a long-lost epic.

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More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Hopscotch' is Anchored in Walter Matthau's Playful, Irascible Personality

// Short Ends and Leader

"With his novel, Hopscotch, Brian Garfield challenged himself to write a suspenseful spy tale in which nobody gets killed.

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