Reviews
Gary Bartz NTU Troop: Harlem Bush Music - Uhuru

Stepping out on his own with the NTU Troop, saxophonist Gary Bartz delivered an empowering declarative opening statement of purpose with 1971’s Harlem Bush Music – Uhuru.

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Rosemary Clooney: I Feel a Song Comin’ On: The Lost Radio Recordings

It’s too late to change the popular perception of Rosemary Clooney as an artist, but this is a pleasant release nonetheless.

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‘The Emoji Code’: It’s So Much More Than Just a Smiley Face

Linguist Vyvyan Evans digs into background and possibilities of Emoji. For lovers of language, it’s a worthy expedition.

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29 Aug 2017 // 2:30 AM

Deerhoof: Mountain Moves

Deerhoof has been cranking out vital, multifaceted music for decades, and their latest album shows no signs of the band slowing down.

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The Pains of Being Pure at Heart: The Echo of Pleasure

The Pains of Being Pure at Heart are back to show us that '80s alternative synthpop isn't dead, and it's perfectly fine to be mopey as long as there's a good beat.

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Dean Hurley: Anthology Resource Vol. 1: △△

The Twin Peaks soundtrack collection exposes a key architect for one of the most daring shows of all time.

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Dan Tepfer Trio: Eleven Cages

A piano trio on the rise, these guys play free or precise, romantic or mechanical, standard or original. Get your ears opened, but there is better on the way, I'd guess.

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‘Tokyo Boogie-Woogie’ Guides Readers on a Musical Journey Through Japanese Modernity

Tokyo Boogie-Woogie outlines the contested space of Japanese popular songs as the modern nation evolves.

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Terrapin’s Allstars Rock Petaluma All Day Long to Keep Music in the Schools

“Outside of the corporate music business, it’s an amazing time for music,” Robinson said prophetically a couple days earlier in an interview on Sonoma’s NPR station KRCB.

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‘Friends From College’ Is a Show About Identity That Fails to Establish Its Own

Netflix's new series stumbles with a season that's sometimes lovely but mostly messy.

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28 Aug 2017 // 2:30 AM

Iron & Wine: Beast Epic

Sam Beam returns to his roots with a warm acoustic record which is often understated but packed with emotional power and arguably his strongest vocal performance to date

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Akercocke: Renaissance in Extremis

After a decade in waiting, progressive black/death metal connoisseur Akercocke, returns with an enticing album of brutal intentions and twisted machinations.

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Chris Speed Trio: Platinum on Tap

The ubiquitous saxophonist goes way forward and way back on this trio date.

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Juiceboxxx: Freaked Out American Loser

Juiceboxxx offers a self-portrait of maybe the most energetic and gregarious loner "freak" ever to put an album on tape.

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‘The Legion of Regrettable Supervillains’ Is a Read You Won’t Regret

For a book about the worst of comic book bad guys, The Legion of Regrettable Supervillains isn’t bad at all. In fact, it’s good fun.

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Literary Theory Gets Bloody in Laurent Binet’s ‘The Seventh Function of Language’

The Seventh Function of Language is either a grand farce or fashionable nonsense.

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Sleazy ‘Good Time’ Takes You to the More Squalid Precincts of the Human Spirit

This riveting crime thriller from the Safdie Brothers is like the slimy friend that knows all the best dives.

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Vic Mensa: The Autobiography

While it may not be his most innovative offering, detailed execution and honesty make it worthwhile.

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Bodies of Water: Spear in the City

Bodies of Water describe themselves as a gospel group, but their sound is more indie rock meets soul than traditional gospel. And that turns out to be a really good sound.

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The Jerry Douglas Band: What If

Dobro wizard Jerry Douglas returns with a virtuosic septet in tow on the jaw-dropping, highly enjoyable What If.

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TIFF 2017: 'The Shape of Water'

// Notes from the Road

"The Shape of Water comes off as uninformed political correctness, which is more detrimental to its cause than it is progressive.

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