Reviews
David Kilgour: The Far Now

Dreamlike clarity and gentle surreality suffuse David Kilgour's sixth full-length solo album, another slow-burning triumph.

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The Frank Hewitt Trio: Fresh from the Cooler

The classic trio of the unfashionably brilliant bop pianist, on excellent ballad form -- his first recording date issued at last.

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12 Jan 2007 // 2:00 AM

Stomp the Yard (2007)

DJ initially channels his shoulder-chippy anger at "the system" though crunk, and his innovative moves make him a crowd favorite.

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12 Jan 2007 // 2:00 AM

Alpha Dog (2006)

The film identifies a limited range of possible "reasons" for the murder, most having to do with ignorance, by the victim, the aggressors, the parents, and the 30 some "witnesses," numbered on screen.

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Pans Labyrinth (El Laberinto del Fauno) (2006)

As her belief in herself comes full circle, as she discovers her crucial mythological role as it exists alongside her role alongside her mother, Ofelia becomes more real than her gorgeous allegory can bear.

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11 Jan 2007 // 9:03 PM

Kamijo: Martha

“You need a bum,” sings Tomoaki Kamijo. “I need a cum.” His pronunciation isn’t perfect, but Martha, his first album, released in 1971 and sung

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11 Jan 2007 // 9:02 PM

The Dirtball: Raptillion

Those looking for a groundbreaking album should look elsewhere, but anyone who wants tight flows, solid production, and catchy hooks need look no farther than Raptillion.

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11 Jan 2007 // 9:01 PM

Takota: The Ivory Tower

Just admit it, kids, emo is the new hair metal.

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The Bee Gees: The Studio Albums 1967-1968

Ten years before Saturday Night Fever, as a fledging combo on the rise, the Bee Gees made three album's worth of masterful pop rock and psych.

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11 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation by Gene Roberts a

"The race beat," once it was finally covered by the American press, was not some kind of intellectual parsing of a larger issue. The coverage itself was essential to solving the issue.

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Matthew Ryan: From a Late Night High Rise

A very personal album from a great singer-songwriter yields surprisingly placid results.

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11 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

Love Is a Mix Tape: Life and Loss, One Song at a Time by Rob Sheffield

Rolling Stone columnist explores the death of his wife and the life of pop music with pathos, humor books.

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Neil Young and Crazy Horse: Live at the Fillmore East

What does this concert sound like? It sounds like what it is: a remarkable document of one of the better bands of its time, performing live with palpable purpose and passion, achieving something pretty close to perfect.

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11 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

Totimoshi: Ladrón

First-rate rustic stoner metal from a reliable, yet criminally overlooked band.

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11 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

Joony Tuff #1

While not exactly original or brilliant, Joony Tuff's story has enough funny moments that a generous reader can get past the sloppiness in presentation to at least chuckle a few times.

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Metallica: Metallica - The Videos 1989-2004

Is Metallica: The Videos 1989-2004 worth a solid viewing? The answer, happily, is a resounding yes.

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Bobby Darin: Seeing Is Believing [DVD]

Bobby Darin was truly a singer's singer. Those who only know a few of his more popular songs need to take a trip back in time and watch how he skillfully worked concert audiences.

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Ran Slavin: Insomniac City

This is a CD and DVD of a 40-minute video art installation. How many video installations do you spend more than five minutes watching, let alone revisit?

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11 Jan 2007 // 9:00 PM

Eric Church: Sinners Like Me

Eric Church sings the first four lines of the first song as if he’s been embodied by Toby Keith, talking about the Middle East,

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The Microscopic Septet: Seven Men in Neckties/Surrealistic Swing

Possibly the most vital jazz group of the 1980s, in retrospect.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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