Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Reviews

Sunday, January 1 1995

The Song of the Earth by Hugh Nissenson

How much knowledge is too much, and if we've already tasted the forbidden fruit, what's to stop us from planting an entire apple orchard? 'The Song of the Earth' stretches our present-day dilemmas into a highly imaginative and yet unnervingly plausible future.


Supercade: A Visual History of the Videogame Age 1971 - 1984 by Van Burnham

Besides sheer nostalgia value, 'Supercade' also points out the impact videogames have made on our culture as a whole.


Swing Shift: All Girl Bands of the 1940s by Sherrie Tucker

Before this book is through, I think you'll completely disagree with George T. Simon's quote that opens the book: 'Only God can make a tree . . . and only men can play jazz.' Women, it seems, can match men, note for note.


Synners by Pat Cadigan

A very intricate and well-plotted work that should appeal to fans of cyberpunk, sci fi and even mystery/suspense.


Steal This Book by Abbie Hoffman

First published in 1970, the classic alternative guide to life is considered by some to be 'the single most important piece of pop culture to come out of the Viet Nam era'.


Sewing Shut My Eyes by Lance Olsen

It truly is 'an avant-pop anti-spectacle' -- that is, something perfectly ordinary.


Speech! Speech! by Geoffrey Hill

For the most part the book has a kind of messy music, and such brilliant juxtapositions of language, that more than thrice I felt like Emily Dickinson, like the top of my head had just been taken off.


Some Assembly Required by George Bradley

Who else but George Bradley would dare use a phrase such as 'which for the nonce' without looking around for a volley of tomatoes? Who else but Bradley would dare use a noun like 'naïf' and keep a straight face?"


The Snow Train by Joseph Cummins

We need to take the lesson that Cummins' offers us: Peace of mind can come from accepting the transition to adulthood. When we begin to think about others and about the history of our actions, we can make peace with ourselves and with the world around us.


Sixties Rock: Garage, Psychedelic & Other Satisfactions by Michael Hicks

In his efforts to define the very building blocks of this music, [Michael Hicks] has stripped it of its vitality and power, although it is perversely impressive to witness Hicks analyse something so primal as Mick Jagger's vocal stylings.


Saving Louisiana? The Battle for Coastal Wetlands by Bill Streever

Scientists have a singular function, to write papers that are printed in 'Science' and 'Nature'. That is about it. But in this context, the scientists live and work in the environment they study, and their laboratory is sinking beneath their feet. They are immersed in the problem by definition.


Spider-Man Confidential: From Comic Icon to Hollywood Hero by Edward Gross

Gross adds nothing new to a story known by anyone with even a passing interest in comics.


Science or Psuedoscience: Magnetic Healing, Psychic Phenomena, and Other Heterodoxies by Henry H. Ba

Bauer's comparisons are thought-provoking and explain some of the dilemmas of anomalistics. Science depends on reproducibility. Anomalistics is the study of things that do not repeat.


Synthetic Bi Products by Sparrow L. Patterson

it just winds up in places much like the teenage world of boredom and struggle for meaning that the novel depicts.


Surrealist Painters and Poets - An Anthology by Mary Ann Caws

This weighty volume has the potential to prove a significant milestone in the appreciation and understanding of that familiar yet much-maligned phenomenon, Surrealism. Beautifully produced, it works in the way the best anthologies should. Well-known pieces take on a new life when placed alongside unknown items and, vast as the collection is, you end up wishing for more.


72dpi-Anime by Edited by Robert Klanten, Hendrik Helige, and Birga Meyer

Far-out publisher Die Gestalten Verlag has created an unprecedented collection of revolutionary multi-media graphic artists. '72dpi-Anime' is a web design exposition, a virtual art fair.


The Smallest Color by Bill Roorbach

Roorbach is a bona fide, credential-carrying '60s savant, and you can trust his voice to describe the era.


Now on PopMatters
Announcements
PM Picks

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.