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Sunday, January 1 1995

cool for you by Eileen Myles

Myles's voice is directed at the reader in a tone that veers between confession and questioning. Her stories are true, or at least they seem true to her.


Cobwebs and Whispers by Scott Thomas

All of the works in 'Cobwebs and Whispers' reflect a pagan sensibility, the forces of nature and darkness oftentimes at direct odds with Christianity, and always preceding and eventually overcoming it.


The Bone Museum: Travels in the Lost Worlds of Dinosaurs and Birds by Wayne Grady

His inclination to pursue ideas about bird and dinosaur evolution takes Grady deeply into the literature and the history of ideas. Grady explores why the Victorian mind, believing that God created the physical world whole and complete, was as disturbed about the idea of extinction as the idea of evolution.


Broadway, the Golden Years: Jerome Robbins and the Great Choreographer-Directors 1940 to the Present

The theater writer must, if he or she does nothing else, portray the performance so that it comes vividly alive in the readers minds eye, whether the portrait is flattering or not.


Bandwagon Effects in High Technology Industries by Jeffrey H. Rohlfs

A world where only two people have telephones is pretty useless. A world where a million people are all connected to a central telephone exchange is a gold mine.


Back When We Were Grownups by Anne Tyler

Rather than succumb to the crisis of identity suffered by the everyman, the ordinary person, Anne Tyler's novels contain characters who come to grips with the consequences of their choices and learn to appreciate their own reality, who begin to feel good in their own skin.


Borrowed Dress by Cathy Colman

...the poems themselves read like flash fiction, suspended moments and strident glimpses into the past as well as intrepid contemplation of the future.


Body Bizarre, Body Beautiful by Nan McNab

'Body Bizarre, Body Beautiful' is an MTV snapshot with bright colors and extended background layouts. It's mostly show and little content, belying the fact that beauty, as well as the reasons people feel for changing their bodies, is anything but skin deep.


The Beauty of the Husband by Anne Carson

The world finds fulfillment in beauty, is content to trace the outside of the package and forfeit all else. But there is a toll: unprofitable love culminates in anguish.


BoyGenius by Yongsoo Park

Transported by a magical blend of metaphor, illumination, and synergy, the plot drives forward down highways of illusion, twisting and turning through an elusive landscape of the bizarre.


The Body Artist by Don DeLillo

One suspects that a simple summary of what the book is 'about' will entirely miss the point; DeLillo's interest lies elsewhere, in the silences and gaps between words, in death and absence.


Bluegrass Odyssey: A Documentary in Pictures and Words, 1966-86 by Carl Fleischhauer and Neil V. Ros

'Bluegrass Odyssey' is more a family album of a small group of entertainers and their quest for acceptance in the turbulent days of the Sixties, Seventies, and Eighties than an in-depth exploration of one of America's favorite musical genres.


Behind the Muse by Bill DeMain

PULL.


The Business of Books: How International Conglomerates Took Over Publishing and Changed the Way We R

Ideas, Schiffrin writes [in 'The Business of Books'], are of paramount importance, and if publishers focus on making money to the exclusion of intellectualism, then we're all in big trouble.


Beat Punks by Victor Bockris

Ostensibly it centers around Bockris' thesis that in the Seventies the survivors of the Beat Generation owed their resurgence to the vitality of punk, which had been, in turn, inspired by the Beats.


Burroughs Live: The Collected Interviews of William S. Burroughs, 1960-1997 Edited by Sylvere Lotrin

He is one of those rare writers who, both in his work and his life, has defied easy categorization and demanded constant reassessment. Though he was a close friend of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsburg, and their crowd, he was never a Beat Generation writer. Neither a poet nor a Buddhist, Burroughs was less concerned with achieving inner harmony than with generating chaos, developing his theories of agencies of control and searching for ways to dismantle them.


The Black & White Book by R.P. Moore

'And what greater contrast is there than placing self-indulgent hatred and disgust right beside profound love and understanding?' R.P. Moore shows us both sides of ourselves in a unique way, in a book destined to become a classic.


Batman Unmasked: Analysing a Cultural Icon by Will Brooker

. . . the main thrust of his study argued to allow a queer reading of the hero's adventures.


The Blue Guide to Indiana by Michael Martone

...a pleasant diversion if deadpan satire is your thing.


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