Reviews
	Various Artists: Motown 1’s

Although the label Berry Gordy started up was a factory more so than a collection of artists, Motown left its mark on American music. What’

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	Sugarcult: Palm Trees and Power Lines

With increasing frequency, pop-punk bands have been courting fans older than the typical 14-year-old mall rat with surprising success: see Brand New, the Get Up

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1 Jun 2004 // 11:00 PM

	Sleep Station: After the War

Oh, what a world we live in: it must be unprecedented that a band who makes an album about World War II draws inevitable comparisons

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	The Pixies: Wave of Mutilation: Best of Pixies

It certainly is a good time to be The Pixies right now. The college rock legends’ reunion tour has been met with such a frenzied

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	The Owls: Our Hopes and Dreams

The Owls all share song credits on their debut release, though it’s clear that despite holding their own as individual songwriters, they’ve come

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1 Jun 2004 // 11:00 PM

	Askeleton: Angry Album -or- Psychic Songs

About 400 miles from both Iceland and Greenland, to the northeast, is an island called Jan Mayen. Although it now has a Norwegian navigation radio and

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1 Jun 2004 // 1:00 AM

The Kids Are Still Alright At the very least, four decades as part of rock’s most exciting band has not dampened the enthusiasm of

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1 Jun 2004 // 1:00 AM

We RagazziPhoto credit: J. Wambsgans We Ragazzi hold an awkward place in my heart. As a workaday Chicago band, they were ripping off jagged, spastic,

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Destroyer Frog Eyes The Impossible Shapes Dan Bejar told us that there’s joy in being barred from the temple, and we solemnly cupped our

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1 Jun 2004 // 1:00 AM

The NYC monthly Flyer magazine has been consistently churning out its free publication for some years now, letting us New Yorkers know what’s happening

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31 May 2004 // 11:00 PM

	Little Feat: Kickin’ It at the Barn

Ask the common music epicure, and Little Feat reached their zenith with 1978’s Waiting for Columbus. The quintessential live album, mixing the Allman Brothers’ blues

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	Langhorne Slim: The Electric Love Letter EP

“Thou shalt not wield the harmonica carelessly, nor shall its tinny power be underestimated”: so sayeth the harmonica rule. A friend of mine once said

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31 May 2004 // 11:00 PM

	Ethan Lipton: A New Low

Ethan Lipton sees things differently than you and I. Where we see a lone man strumming a ukulele, he sees a veritable orchestra. Where we

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	Dilated Peoples: Neighborhood Watch

Dilated Peoples are one of those groups whose major label work has never managed to completely fulfill the promise of their early, underground releases. They’

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	The Dirty Dozen Brass Band: Funeral for a Friend

Imagine, if you will, a brass instrument whose head resembles the oversized offspring of a boa constrictor attempting to engulf an open parasol and a

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	The Bottle Rockets: Leftovers [re-issue]

The Bottle Rockets are the best band from a town called Festus, this much we know. The group, seemingly poster boys for magazines like No

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31 May 2004 // 11:00 PM

	Athlete: Vehicles & Animals

Mom and Dad love him more. He exerts his independence, and is still appreciated for who he is. He has more natural talent than you,

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	Truth Hurts: Ready Now

The first vocals on Shari Watson’s second album are Raphael Saadiq intoning “take one”. Indeed, the track that follows would have fit onto Instant

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It possesses a bleak view of supposed heroes: politicians, businessmen, even superheroes are manifestations of The Other's violence and blind hatred.

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The Escapist project is a sprawling, ambitious form of comic-book meta-fiction that bounces back-and-forth between rediscovered potboilers from the '40s to '80s and scholarly essays offering context and academic takes on these works.

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'True Detective': Maybe Tomorrow

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"True Detective, Season 2, Episode 3: Where does the kitsch end and the surreal begin?

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