Reviews > Books
No ‘Idiot Brain’ Is an Island

If you want the human brain explained to you, it's best to consult an amateur comedian.

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Junkies, Wannabe Artists, Criminals and Other Temporary Friends in ‘The Customer is Always Wrong’

Throughout all of Pond's graphic memoir/confessional, her funny, biting, and overall authentic voice is brought to life with her expressive ink and watercolor panels.

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Everything Was Fine Until It Wasn’t: ‘The Ends of the World’

Connecting deep time with human time and the picturesque with the disastrous, The Ends of the World shows that there may be inescapable consequences for our history and habit of improvident behavior.

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‘ORAKL’ Brilliantly Breathes New Life Into Georg Trakl’s Poetry

Daniel Pantano is creator as much as translator, mixing and sampling the works of Georg Trakl in a collaborative endeavor.

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‘The Poetry of Pop’ Takes a Scholarly Look at Lyrics Both Profound and Vapid

The Poetry of Pop is a testament to the power, craftsmanship, and worthwhile intent of even the most ostensibly thin tunes.

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‘Goodbye, Things’, on Japanese Minimalism, Requires a Certain Maximalist Means

Sasaki's simplify-your-life minimalism plan requires a certain amount of disposable income to achieve.

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‘Confessions of a Recovering Environmentalist and Other Essays’ Attempts to Escape the Progress Trap

Recovering the sacred for a secular mindset, Paul Kingsnorth restores the awe and the caution of the numinous.

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Consumption, Performance, and ‘The Agony of Eros’

Byung-Chul Han argues that love, sex, and even theory are disappearing in consumer cultures because our systems of finances and behaviors erode the Other in favor of sameness.

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‘Brexit and the British’ Examines the Emotional State of a Divided Union

With tempers frayed and friendships tested following the Brexit referendum, it's easy to lose sight of what it means to be British at all.

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‘Arithmetic’ Delightfully Yields Anything But Obvious Results

What looks like a simple topic becomes a surprising trip into unexpected worlds in Paul Lockhart's beautifully executed Arithmetic.

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‘T2 Trainspotting’ Is Just ‘Porno’ Repackaged

Irvine Welsh’s pacey, gritty, but often daft, follow-up to Trainspotting receives another printing run, but to what purpose?

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Ann Powers’ ‘Good Booty’ and the Connection Between Eroticism and Popular Music

This is how American music got its sexual groove on.

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‘The Many Lives of Catwoman’ Captures the Many Influences of This Multifaceted Superhero

Author and comic book historian Tim Hanley explores the far more than nine lives of DC’s Catwoman in this thoroughly in-depth biography/cultural contextualization.

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Franz Hessel’s ’ Reprinted Walking in Berlin’ Celebrates the Observant Urban Stroller

Reading Walking in Berlin is the next best thing to traveling back in time to visit the capital of the Weimar Republic as it was in 1929.

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Frank Turner Lives for the Show, and the Show Is Almost Always on the Road

While the gold standard for tour diaries may still be Rollins' Get in the Van, Turner's memories of more than a thousand gigs in The Road Beneath My Feet are entertaining and heartfelt.

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‘The Devil’s Bargain’: Some Men Just Want to Watch America Burn

Joshua Green’s swift and incisive political war story tells how Steve Bannon's years-long nationalist insurgent campaign culminated in the election of Donald Trump.

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The Wordless Protagonist of ‘Leaf’ Doesn’t Save the World—Just Improves It

The absence of life-or-death consequences in Daishu Ma's debut graphic novel lowers the stakes while raising the novel’s quiet complexity.

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‘Uncomfortably Happily’ Considers the Radical Notion of Expecting Less of One’s Self

Marriage and creativity through the eyes of an artist burdened by student debt and the frustration of a changing economy.

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Metatextual Games Stamp Out Thriller Conventions in ‘Based on a True Story’

French author Delphine de Vigan is very successful at setting up an original mystery, but she gets bogged down in overly literary reflections.

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“All the News That Fits”: Rolling Stone Celebrates 50 Years

As a teen with Rolling Stone you weren't just buying a magazine -- you were buying a piece of the hipness and cool that told people you were really serious about music and culture.

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'Inside' and the Monstrosity of Collectivism

// Moving Pixels

"An ability to manipulate a collective is a hint at what a little boy's power as an individual might be.

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