Reviews > Books
Roberto M. Dainotto Explores the Making of the Mafia Myth

The Mafia: A Cultural History offers a Sicilian perspective on the enduring popularity of organized crime stories.

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‘Coin-Operated Americans’ Tells of the Time When Arcades Took the Children of Displaced Workers

America’s youth crowded arcades, deposited quarters, and saw a way out of the modern, productive industrial economy of the post-war US and into the postmodern, postindustrial consumer economy that we inhabit today.

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Joan Didion Bio ‘The Last Love Song’ Is an Example of What We Tell Ourselves When Our Subject Won’t

Tracy Daugherty's well-meaning but misguided biography of Joan Didion is marred by supposition and stylistic mimicking.

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Patti Smith’s Practice of Everyday Living Will Intrigue Readers of ‘M Train’

Every chapter in M Train digs a fresh grave in the chambers of Patti Smith's memory.

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28 Sep 2015 // 8:00 AM

Mario Vargas Llosa Gives Culture Its Last Rites

When Vargas Llosa condemns the culture of spectacle that has invaded not only our film, television, and art, but our politics and news outlets, it isn’t with the feverish outrage of a man railing against a disoriented younger generation

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Choice Shapes the World in ‘Not on Fire, But Burning’

Greg Hrbek gives us a War on Terror that's not too far from our own.

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Heidegger’s ‘Hegel’ Is Philosophy With a Capital F

Hegel’s philosophies are of critical importance to Western thought but this new translation of Heidegger’s interpretations may make even the most stalwart of academics sigh in frustration.

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The Prolific Judd Apatow Doesn’t Seem so ‘Sick in the Head’

In his recent book, Judd Apatow gives you the greatest party you've never been invited to.

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Michel Houellebecq’s ‘Submission’ Tackles Motives for Conversion

Houellebecq's latest satire has a core of deep humanism running through it.

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Violence, Glee, Phantasmagoria: Gaiman’s ‘Neverwhere’

Readers familiar with Neil Gaiman’s dreamscapes will find new corners of Neverwhere in this new edition of the author’s seminal first novel.

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Annie Barrows’ ‘The Truth According to Us’ Is Charming, Wise, and Warm

Barrows explores the idea of truth—particularly the way the truth mixes with history and memory.

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‘The League of Regrettable Superheroes’ Is a Heroic, Enjoyable Effort

Jon Morris’ book is a courageous, witty look at 100 short-lived superheroes you’ll never see coming to a theater near you.

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Romance and Rebellion in the Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley

Charlotte Gordon's dual biography of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley is an engaging read, but it's hampered by pedestrian writing and a too reverent perspective of its protagonists.

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Margaret Atwood’s Latest, ‘The Heart Goes Last’, Takes Us Back to Our Future Dystopia

True love ultimately endures in The Heart Goes Last, but so do the real terrors ever-present in Atwood's novels.

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There’s a Perverse Thrill in Reading a Book That Presages the Possible Extinction of Humankind

Superintelligence is a serious, intellectually disorientating treatment of ideas, imagining the inevitable future when we are able to create an artificial general intelligence.

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‘Imaginary Cities’ Is a Book to Enjoy Getting Lost In

In charting the cities of human fancy, Darran Anderson has created the opposite of an atlas.

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‘The Pop Festival’ Seems to Have Missed the Music

The Pop Festival is largely an overly self-serious look at an essentially less-than-serious pop cultural event.

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Salvador Dalí’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’ Work Finally Gets Some Mad Love

This edition is valuable because it underscores a variety of connections that are generally not foregrounded in the work of either Lewis Carroll or Salvador Dalí.

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‘The Fantastic Made Visible’ Suffers From Some Blind Spots

The essays within display a fantastic array of quality.

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Felicia Day Bares All (But Not That) in Her Precocious Memoir

You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) is a frank and funny look at how Felicia Day's unconventional formative years set her up to become the talent she is today.

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//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2015: 'Dark Echo'

// Moving Pixels

"Dark Echo drops you into a pitch back maze and then renders your core tools of navigation into something quite life threatening.

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