Reviews > Books
A Breezy Visit With Arthur Conan Doyle and His Most Famous Creation

With Arthur and Sherlock, Michael Sims seeks to answer how Arthur Conan Doyle went from modestly successful physician to world-famous writer of detective stories.

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‘A Little History of Economics’ Provides a Charming Overview of the Dismal Science

Niall Kishtainy, writing for a general audience, provides a breezy stroll through economic thought, from Plato to Thomas Piketty.

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‘Welcome to Night Vale’ Is a “Welcome” Introduction to a Strange New World

Although it takes a while for the heart of Welcome to Night Vale to be revealed, it's ultimately worth the journey.

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Speed Bumps Are Dumb, and Other Thoughts on ‘Traffic’

Everybody hates traffic, but what should we do about it?

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This Will Be the Last Time You Hear from Me: John Darnielle’s Universal Harvester

Universal Harvester won’t shock you or stay with you for a long time, but like most found footage movies, it’ll keep you on the edge of your seat along the way.

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There Is Only One Reality, and It’s Analog

Digital dystopians beware: the analog counterrevolution is here.

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Science, Creativity, and Imagination (and the Earth)

Earth partners something even more unlikely than pumpkin and coffee or Nutella and bacon: an English professor and a planetary scientist.

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The View From There: Joan Didion’s ‘South and West’

Joan Didion went on the road 50 years ago. The trenchant observations, however fragmentary, are timely.

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‘Variety’ Is a Fascinating, Inviting Exploration Into the Concept

Analogous to the elements (i.e., atoms) generating the varied world around us, so too the elements of language can be rearranged to create a vast number of meanings.

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It’s Apple’s World, Just Click and Agree to It

Ever wonder what you agree to when you click on the terms and conditions for iTunes? Read R. Sikoryak's Terms and Conditions and be awakened.

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Works—Not ‘of Art’: Marcel Duchamp As Not an Artist

Filipovic's new book explores the ways in which Duchamp marshaled his curatorial efforts to investigate the ontological bounds of the artwork.

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There’s an Impactful Tale Buried Within Emma Richler’s ‘Be My Wolff’

Richler’s details can be drearily extraneous and erudite, yet they also demonstrate how dedicated and well-researched she is in regards to her characters and the world in which they live.

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‘Is It All In Your Head?’ When Imaginary Illness Is Real

Is it all in your head? According to neurologist Suzanne O'Sullivan, it doesn't really matter.

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The Country and the Metropolis: Thomas Hardy, a Divided Man

Mark Ford's compelling study offers the first thorough account of Thomas Hardy as "a London Man".

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Rose Tremain’s ‘The Gustav Sonata’ Is an Honest and Sensitive Look at Human Foibles

It’s a mark of Tremain’s accomplished writing that in these relatively short chapters there's nearly always some kind of revelation or surprise, some kind of turning point.

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On Race and Meritocracy in Academia

Today's elite universities and students claim to value diversity. But do they really?

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Food Films Get Eaten Alive by ‘Feasting Our Eyes’

So we should watch more Super Size Me and less Babette’s Feast? C’mon.

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A Letter From Your Lesbian Friend to Your Black Friend

Some reflections on the challenge of educating allies, with the help of Ben Passmore's Your Black Friend.

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‘The Book of the Dead’ Reflects the Complexity of Its Author and His Times

Orikuchi Shinobu's work helps to illustrate the power of fiction and literature to bring to life -- quite literally, in this case -- academic theories surrounding religion, folklore and sociology.

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‘Testosterone Rex’ Delivers an Anticlimactic Attempt to Extinguish Gender Myths

Light on science, heavy on smugness, Testosterone Rex, does everyone a disservice.

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Tibet House's 30th Anniversary Benefit Concert Celebrated Philip Glass' 80th

// Notes from the Road

"Philip Glass, the artistic director of the Tibet House benefits, celebrated his 80th birthday at this year's annual benefit with performances from Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, Brittany Howard, Sufjan Stevens and more.

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