Reviews > Books
A Convent Goes Psycho-Sexual in ‘The Nuns of Sant’Ambrogio’

Based on the detailed notes from the original Roman Inquisition investigation long buried in a Vatican archive, Wolf unravels a tale of religious madness and power trips.

READ more
‘All the Light We Cannot See’: People in the Dark, Hunting the Right Frequency

In Anthony Doerr's richly romantic jewel quest of a war novel, a blind girl and an engineering prodigy pulse ever closer to each other across a ravaged Europe.

READ more
This Collection of the Band’s Memories Makes Led Zeppelin Actually Likeable

No matter how grandiose the Led Zeppelin legend gets, hearing the golden gods tell their tale is both astounding and more real than anything anyone could ever make up.

READ more
This ‘Vanity Fair’ Retrospective Reveals the Spirit of the Early Decades of 20th Century America

Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers and Swells is a celebration of progress, of progressives, prophecy, and prescience.

READ more
‘Naked Cinema: Working With Actors’ Resonates

In this absorbing volume, Sally Potter provides an exploration of the director/actor relationship that teems with insight and intelligence, offering inspiration whatever your creative pursuits.

READ more
Diving Deep Into the Other Worlds of Japan’s Most Famous Living Writer

Haruki Murakami is famous for his magical worlds rich in issues of identity and psychology. Strecher's book is the road map to understand the twisting, metaphysical 'Over There' of Murakami.

READ more
‘The Price of Thirst’ Offers a Disturbing Analysis of Forthcoming Chaos Over Water Inequality

From California to Iraq; from Chile to India; struggles over water are coming to define the political and military conflicts of the 21st century.

READ more
‘The Transcriptionist’ Is Immersed in Words

For Lena Respass, the last transcriptionist working at New York's daily newspaper, The Record, a brief bus ride beside a blind woman changes everything.

READ more
‘The B-Side’ Is an Entertaining Study of the American Songbook

This will be one big revelation for anyone steeped in a rock-centric understanding of pop history, and validation for those who treasure the Songbook in all its glory.

READ more
The Story of a Robot Named Stinky and the Four Boys Who Built It

Even with the discussion of refractions, range finders, and thermocouples, and the light moments and humor, deportation and immigration status concerns are always there for these four boys.

READ more
Recovery and Renewal: Showa’s Magnificent Epic History of Japan Continues to Deliver

The third and latest edition of Shigeru Mizuki’s acclaimed history of Japan chronicles the pivotal period of 1944-1953, in which a shattered Japan began its rebirth into the form we know today.

READ more
On Chasing an Enemy That’s Too Small to See

Confronting Contagion tries to capture the 3,000-year history behind a modern scientific breakthrough: the discovery that tiny organisms invade our bodies and make us sick.

READ more
Donald Hall’s ‘Essays After Eighty’ Is an Unsparing Look at Extreme Old Age

To presume to review works of this level is farcical; we can only be overjoyed by their continued existence.

READ more
The Unending Saga of Internet Cops, Robbers, and the Rest of Us

Creative chaos may be the mother of Internet invention. But inventiveness is a threat to the Powers-that-be. Is crime-fighting just another handy euphemism for Orwellian consolidation?

READ more
Glen Duncan’s Existential Horror Is So Good, It’s a Curse

These characters navigate a constellation of theological ruins and failed rationalizations, wherein existential nausea must do battle with the hunger of the werewolf Curse.

READ more
September 11, 2001, Is Said to Be the Most Photographed Disaster in History

9/11 and the Visual Culture of Disaster examines the tremulous memory effects of the destruction of the World Trade Center.

READ more
How Pioneering Blues Women Were All But Written out of “Official” Blues History

While industry gatekeepers were invested in a specific image of black performance, black performers themselves had different ideas.

READ more

13 Jan 2015 // 7:00 AM

Pop Like an Egyptian

Cairo's youth find meaning and identity in a genre that can't get any respect.

READ more
‘Ada’s Algorithm’ Dishes the Dirt and Makes the Case for the World’s First Programmer

With the enthusiasm of a celebrity journalist and the deep reading of an academic, James Essinger presents a flawed portrait of the flawed life of Lord Byron's daughter, Ada Lovelace.

READ more
There’s More Than Just Magic in Neil Patrick Harris’ Clever Autobiography

What's most remarkable about Harris' freewheeling bio, Choose Your Own Autobiography, is that even with all its tricks and jokes, there's actual substance to be found here.

READ more
More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Hozier + Death Cab for Cutie + Rock Radio 104.5's Birthday Show (Photo Gallery)

// Notes from the Road

"Radio 104.5's birthday show featured great bands and might have been the unofficial start of summer festival season in the Northeast.

READ the article