Reviews > Books
Summer Turns to Fall: Revisiting the ‘Summer of Love’ 50 Years Later

Summer of Love simultaneously demonstrates why that moment in the cultural timeline is worth commemorating, what its legacy is, and what was lost as summer turned to fall.

READ more
Joe Bonomo’s ‘Field Recordings’ Makes Plain the Poetry Inside of Him

In his lifelong attachments to music, Bonomo holds on loosely and succeeds in never letting go.

READ more
Does It Take a Superhero to Understand One’s Own Mind?

In A Little More Human, Fiona Maazel provides a madcap conspiracy involving high-tech medicine and the stranger within.

READ more
‘Beyond Trans’ Exposes the Absurd Sex and Gender Bureaucracy

Reading Beyond Trans is like having one's window shades thrown open after arising from a long night of sleep: the sunlight burns the eyes, but it awakens them.

READ more
‘Pussy’ Is a Savage Satire in the Form of a Comic Fairytale

Howard Jacobson shows that Donald Trump may not be beyond satire, after all...

READ more
Allen Ginsberg: The Artist as Mensch

The overwhelming impression from Ginsberg's interviews is his lack of ego. He comes across, again and again, as a fundamentally decent person.

READ more
‘The Production of Money’: How to Break the Bankers and Put Our Broken Economy Back Together

There’s plenty of money floating around in the world, but it’s all in the wrong places.

READ more
A Warts and All Look at 150 years of Women’s Wrestling

As GLOW gets a second look on Netflix and a group of new women wrestlers grab attention in the WWE, Pat Laprade and Dan Murphy celebrate the female performers who paved the way.

READ more
‘Post Grad’ Takes a Hard, Honest Look at Life After College

Many recent grads will appreciate knowing that they aren’t the only ones struggling after graduating college.

READ more
The Long Life of a Shattering and Complex Idea: Civil War

How a conflict is defined and labeled can make all the difference in whether an organization such as the Red Cross comes on the scene.

READ more
‘Was She Pretty?’ Depicts a Litany of Ex-lovers

Was She Pretty? may suggest that anxieties over exes are universal, it also subtlety critiques its circle of privileged sufferers.

READ more
‘Practicable’ Proposes to Rewrite Postwar Western Art History

Both a historical survey and a theoretical treatise, this book highlights key artists and movements, of course, and then brings broader humanities and social science perspectives to bear.

READ more
Dressing Like Dolls as a Form of Resistance: ‘So Pretty / Very Rotten’

Unlike the western understanding of the word, "Lolitas" engage in a somewhat sexless performance of innocence, fairy tale femininity, and cultural resistance.

READ more
Finally, a Proper Biography of Chrissie Hynde

Despite the analytic difficulties inherently present in Hynde as a subject, Sobsey truly does deliver the goods.

READ more

8 Jun 2017 // 8:30 AM

Dreams Can Be Deadly

The Nightwalker may not make perfect sense once it concludes, but its level of engagement, imagination, and self-reflection makes it unforgettably haunting,

READ more
LGBTQ People at Home, at Ease

Tom Atwood's Kings & Queens in Their Castles celebrates the diversity of the gay, lesbian, and transgender community with a series of beautiful portraits of people in their homes.

READ more
When It Comes to Collecting Vinyl, It’s Better to Be a Freak Than a Snob

John Corbett exposes a beautiful and dusty world forgotten but kept alive by that dying medium known as the vinyl record.

READ more
‘A Woman Looking at Men Looking at Women’: Siri Hustvedt and the Art of Thinking

Hustvedt reminds us that the making and encountering of art is often embodied, rooted in material and biological and neurological functions.

READ more
Sometimes, a Budweiser Is Better

Recreating the world's oldest fermented drinks should make for entertaining reading material. It doesn't.

READ more
Thi Bui Asks Readers to Reconsider Their Assumptions About the Vietnam War

Bui’s powers as a documentarian and oral historian make The Best We Could Do a thought-provoking take on Vietnam and immigrant experiences in general.

READ more
More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media
//Blogs

TIFF 2017: 'The Royal Hibiscus Hotel'

// Notes from the Road

"Though a typical rom-com, Ishaya Bako's film is never boring.

READ the article