Reviews > Books
The Life of a Navy Wife Is Told With Blazing Honesty in ‘The War At Home’

An existence of constant upheavals, classified work, and arcane cultural mores, the military is a peculiarly isolated place even as it runs parallel to civilian life.

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Race and Sci-fi Theory: Not Just for Dissertations Anymore

Ever thought Toni Morrison's Beloved has a place at ComicCon? Carringont's Speculative Blackness might be for you.

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The Warhol Paradox and ‘On&By Andy Warhol’

Andy Warhol seemed to always have it both ways. He was able to play high against low, simple against complex, present and yet far away, sexual/asexual, etc.

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There’s No Room for You in Hannah Tennant-Moore’s ‘Wreck and Order’

Our self-indulgent protagonist tries to find herself in the rural poverty of the third world but the people, the customs, the food, it all starts to grate on her first world sensibilities.

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‘The Age of Lovecraft’ Wonderfully Elucidates the Central Dilemma Posed by Lovecraft

The Age of Lovecraft asks readers to weigh his undeniable revulsion toward non-white, non-male bodies against his vision of a cosmos indifferent to all humans.

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A Smart But Brief Look at the Undervalued Half of the World’s Population

Who Cooked Adam Smith’s Dinner? is a sharply written book on economics for people who aren't economists.

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Finding the ‘Art’ in Historical Fiction and Narrative History

Christopher Bram's sincere love for historical storytelling is contagious.

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European Fine Art Meets Japanese Manga in ‘Guardians of the Louvre’

Jiro Taniguchi's installment proves that contemporary manga artists can hold their own against the greatest in the pantheon of western art.

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Thomas Hauser’s ‘Muhammad Ali: A Tribute to the Greatest’ Is But Another Chapter

Ali's foremost biographer writes a coda to the champ's life -- but it shouldn't be the final word.

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Ruth Ozeki on Making Peace With the Mirror

What did her face look like before her parents were born? Ruth Ozeki decided to find out.

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Living by the Word in Jooyoung Lee’s ‘Blowin’ Up: Rap Dreams in South Central’

Blowin’ Up peers into the world of hip-hop as it is lived by some of the art form’s most dedicated practitioners.

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‘Under the Harrow’ Is a Gripping Exploration Into Grief, Manipulation and Jealosy

Under the Harrow's narrator will leave you both empathetic to what she bears and enraged at what she becomes.

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Barbara Freese Reminds Us: Power Over Nature Is Bought at a Great Price

This new edition of Coal is a compulsively readable history of how coal made the modern world, and of modern attempts to to make a world without coal.

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‘Back to the Fifties’ Points the Finger Directly at the Rise of Ronald Reagan

Back to the Fifties sheds light on the politicized motivations behind the pop cultural revisionist view of the Fifties in the wake of the tumultuous Sixties.

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‘Adultery’ Makes a Legal Argument With Clarity

Deborah L. Rhode examines infidelity in a variety of arenas; from the military to politics, from marriage to alternative lifestyles.

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‘Global Punk’: The Longevity of Punk Encourages

No previous survey of punk has likely examined a Celtic band from Indonesia, or swept across the Basque Country, Poland, and Edinburgh as well as Long Island, Chicago, or Austin.

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‘Horses, Horses, In the End the Light Remains Pure’

Hideo Furukawa’s journey into Fukushima, post 3/11, is a journey into overlapping, concentric circles.

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James Thomas Shares His Oddball Sensibilities in Book Form

Why the Long Joke? is the perfect anecdote to all of the sad and terrible news and information with which we are pummeled on a daily basis.

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‘The Naked Blogger of Cairo’ Combines Erudition With Style and Wit

Dwelling on the role of social media in political upheaval risks ignoring the human body, which lies at the root of creative insurgency.

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‘Warren Zevon: Desperado of Los Angeles’ and the Balance of Fandom and Criticism

George Plasketes has to balance fan appreciation and critical detachment here. He succeeds in providing a deep compendium of all things Zevon.

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//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2016: 'Downfall' Explores Depression, Bulimia, and Suicide through Horror

// Moving Pixels

"Downfall finds horror in helpfulness.

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