Reviews > Books
‘Broadcast Hysteria’ Revisits When a Pop Culture Event Went Wildly Viral

This deeply researched account reveals the history and misconceptions behind the legendary piece of radio theater, "War of the Worlds".

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The Nuclear Family Explodes in ‘Mislaid’

Nell Zink's characters represent and confront most of the "-isms" and phobias related to the “Other” that still plague not only the USA, but the entire world.

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A Wicked Sense of Humor Veers Heavily Towards the Sadistic in ‘Crow Fair’

If sometimes flawed, often confusing and always marked by challenging style, Thomas McGuane's Crow Fair remains a remarkable offering from one of America's finest writers.

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Have We Colonized the Night? Or Has Neoliberal Capitalism Colonized Us?

Bright Eyed: Insomnia and its Cultures has us wondering if our work-obsessed society, which valorizes sleeplessness, is inventing new technologies to keep us perpetually "on".

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‘Calcutta’ Is a Vivid, Sensitive, and Perceptive Literary Portrait of the City

The author presents a balanced, if occasionally slow-paced, portrait of his birthplace, detailing his travels and memories of Calcutta over a two-year period.

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How Messy Was Their (Black) Sabbath

Mick Wall’s style is dry, simple and direct to the point of quasi-simplification, but the final result is brilliant and definitely written for a very specific niche.

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Exposing the Dark Side of Philanthro-capitalism

In The New Prophets of Capital, Nicole Aschoff makes clear that there is something new, pervasive, and anti-democratic going on that we ignore at our peril.

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Is Growing Up Such a Good Thing?

Adventure Time and Philosophy takes us on a journey to the land of Ooo in search of truth.

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23 Jun 2015 // 6:00 AM

Prick Me, Do I Not Bleed?

Are feminists like Leora Tanenbaum oversensitive?

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23 Jun 2015 // 1:05 AM

The Banality of Destiny

Fateful Ties is exhaustive and exhaustingly catalogued history of the US' aggressively narcissistic relationship with China.

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Charting the Universal Evolution of Pop Music With ‘The Underground is Massive’

From rags to riches, the ghetto to the festival grounds, the story of electronic music is the story of modern art in America: vibrant, fruitful and progressive -- until it becomes a commodity.

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‘A God in Ruins’ Perpetuates the Deep Sadness in Atkinson’s Writing

Kate Atkinson's characters, from private investigator Jackson Brodie to Teddy Todd, are often lonely people with surprising secrets.

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Edward St. Aubyn Is Compulsively Readable

'The Complete Patrick Melrose Novels' is a bitter comedy of manners that takes readers on a sordid, stylish, disturbing, funny and profound moral journey.

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‘Pedro’ Is a Glorious Romp Full of Stories That Only Pedro Martinez Can Tell

No one can say Pedro did not walk the walk.

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‘Your Band Sucks’ Ain’t No Self-Pity Party

Finally, a rock ‘n’ roll memoir that's just as much about disappointment as it is about success.

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Almond Joys, Coffee Shops, and ‘The Triumph of Seeds’

Thor Hanson is the kind of writer who can take something so seemingly simple and so often overlooked and make it not only relevant, but fun.

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Israel, Palestine, and the Visual Administration of Occupation

Attending to the visual practices that regulate the Israeli occupation of Palestine, Gil Hochberg’s Visual Occupations opens up new ways of seeing life under occupation.

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‘I Found My Friends’ Is a Drop in the Bucket of the Nirvana Story

Nick Soulsby tries to crack the case of Nirvana, the watershed band that very few saw coming.

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Romance and Science Conflict in ‘The Memory Painter’

A very cool sci-fi concept anchors The Memory Painter, but unremarkable prose and tonal inconsistency mar what is otherwise an interesting tale.

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The Aliens Landed in Latin America a Long Time Ago

Past Futures makes clear; futuristic and fantastical art has long been a feature of Latin American sci-fi.

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More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

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