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Tuesday, August 26 2014

Tracing the Mythos of Dylan, One Fan at a Time

The Dylanologists doesn't give up any answers about Dylan, but it does ask the right questions of people, on the trail through Dylan's America.


If You Can’t Take the Heat, Get Out of the (Restaurant) Kitchen

Popular Orangette blogger Molly Wizenberg loves to cook, as made clear in Delancey... just not in restaurants.


Monday, August 25 2014

Organized Murder and the Graphic Anthology, ‘To End All Wars’

This stark, chiaroscuro compilation promotes a humanitarian view of the First World War, as witnessed by an array of Earth's beleaguered creatures.


Which Is Better, Gorgeous Writing or a Gorgeous Blonde?

In The Black-Eyed Blond, Benjamin Black provides such a satisfying incarnation of Raymond Chandler's sensibility, it's almost possible to pretend Chandler is back among the living.


Friday, August 22 2014

What a Quart of Whiskey Might Assuage, but Never Alleviate

Guitar music gave John Fahey a bridge to the subconscious, and his subconscious evidently was a scary realm.


Thursday, August 21 2014

‘The Answer to Everything’ Questions the Veracity of Truth

If this doesn’t get shortlisted for the Giller Prize, well, that would be just proof that the world is an unjust place.


Jon Gnarr Is Changing the World One Laugh at a Time

The unlikely, improbable, unbelievable – and totally true – story of Iceland’s anarchist comedian turned politician.


Wednesday, August 20 2014

‘Falling Out of Time’ Is a Profound Dissection of Grief

Woven like a colorful tapestry of many characters, all of whom share the misfortune of having lost a child, this is structured like an epic poem which, despite its short length, feels fully realized.


What’s Happening to College Education in the Digital Era?

From MOOCs to Second Life to chairs that move, Elizabeth Losh discusses all things technological in The War on Learning.


Tuesday, August 19 2014

The Impossible Reach of History Is Made Possible in ‘The Hundred Year House’

In one of the best books of 2014, Rebecca Makkai tells a story of time, ghosts, fate, unrequited love, requited love unconsummated, and art.


Monday, August 18 2014

Sarah Waters’ New Novel May Not Inspire a Thousand Worldwide Celebrations, but It Should

The Paying Guests is a skillful work of genuinely entertaining literary fiction.


‘Console Wars’ Is a Deeply Flawed Telling of a Great Story about Videogames

A book on the origins of Sega, a gaming industry giant of great historical importance, could have been great.


Friday, August 15 2014

‘The Mad and the Bad’ Is One Helluva Ride

You'll want to investigate some of Jean-Patrick Manchette's zany work before the Colin Firth and Sean Penn "Manchette adaptations" hit the big screen.


Thursday, August 14 2014

Is Sex Evil?

Megan Abbott's The Fever gives a lot to chew on, with its subject of female sexuality. You might just wind up crossing your legs, when reading this book.


Penn Penitentiary, Where Converts Dwell Among Convicts

In Down in the Chapel, Joshua Dubler reports on the tensions of the body and the spirit, the restless minds and the stifled desires.


Wednesday, August 13 2014

In ‘The Blazing World’, a Lifetime of Smothered Rage Blossoms into an Ingenious Plan

A serious examination of what female artists continue to endure, this is unquestionably one of the year’s finest novels.


Tuesday, August 12 2014

‘The Ghost in the Electric Blue Suit’ and Graham Joyce’s Slipstream Writing

A bit unusual for Joyce, this book mutes the fantastical elements and reads more like a straight-up coming of age story.


William Shakespeare and George Lucas? Could Any Two Writers Be Farther Apart?

Ian Doescher's translation of Return of the Jedi into the style and syntax of William Shakespeare steps between the ridiculous and the sublime.


Monday, August 11 2014

In ‘California’ the World Has Gone to Hell for No Good Reason

The careful yet laconic nature of Edan Lepucki’s writing mirrors that of her post-catastrophic setting; life is finely captured but little seems to matter, anymore.


Some Assembly Is Required for Reading ‘Boston Mob’

At times, Mark Songini stretches ideas beyond their breaking point, making the reader reassemble them with Krazy Glue and chicken wire.


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