Reviews > Books
Hamid’s Collection of Essays on Life, Art and Politics Sparkle With the Magic of His Prose

The essays in Discontent and its Civilizations treat their subjects with skill and beauty; sharing an idea or insight and then leaving it to the reader to nurture the thought further.

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‘I Am Sorry to Think I Have Raised a Timid Son’ Shows Russell’s Potential

Kent Russell explores multiple, often bizarre manifestations of American masculinity in addition to his own.

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‘So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed’ Makes One Wonder, Are All Internet Outrages Fabricated?

Internet shamings are simple: people say dumb things, are then pilloried for it and in the ensuing frenzy lose their jobs and reputations.

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‘Seraphim 266613336 Wings’ Will Set Your Imagination Afire

This little-known collaboration between, Mamoru Oshii and Satoshi Kon, two giants of anime was never completed. But it’s very much worth reading anyway.

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A Look Into the Shadows Cast by Hitler’s Rise to Power

A victory of endurance, Blood Brothers should also be recognised as a testament to the resilient spirit of art and culture.

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The Master of Dark Yet Delightful Russian Tales About Family Is Back

Russia’s premiere teller of bleak, woeful tales strikes again with There Once Lived a Mother Who Loved Her Children Until They Moved Back In.

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No One Gets Away Unscathed in David Joy’s Latest

Where All Light Tends to Go is unflinchingly violent, difficult to witness, and tragic from its outset.

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On “the Agony of Becoming”

Green Girl is Kate Zambreno's searing meditation on a young American girl's coming-to-being in London.

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Marge Piercy and the Geography of Home

In topics ranging from poverty to war’s ravages to environmental collapse, Piercy obeys the poet’s dictum to act as witness with Made in Detroit.

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It’s an Art Form, Talking ‘Bout Your Mama

Readers that aren’t easily offended will find themselves laughing and cringing at what is surely the raunchiest history book in years.

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Damn Scandinavians! Why Are They Always So Almost Nearly Perfect?

Michael Booth sets out to investigate the mystery of Scandinavian perfection. He doesn’t find the answer, but what he does find is equally entertaining.

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Erik Larson’s Latest Is a Gripping Tale of a Sinking Luxury Ship Not Named Titanic

Larson's description of the torpedoing of the Lusitania churns like an angry sea, full of detail gleaned from memoirs and letters of survivors and rescuers.

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‘A Bad Character’ Is Courageous in Its Realism and the Many Chances Its Author Has Taken

This is Deepti Kapoor’s time to paint a picture of India that no one has the nerve to do anymore.

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Wonder of Wonders: A New/Old Anthology From Teffi

The stories in Subtly Worded are lost gems from Russia's wacky past.

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‘The Whites’ Gives Slumming a Good Name

Reported reality gives Price’s novel, published under his new crime-genre pen name Harry Brandt, a sharp tang that resonates with the best of his work.

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‘Dreaming of Cinema’ Demonstrates Why the Humanities Are Out of Touch

For better or worse, contemporary scholars in cinema studies spend more time drawing from and debating one another than talking about films.

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On the Very Bones of the Wireless World

The Undersea Network changes our imagination of communications infrastructure, revealing how culture, politics and geography interrelate in the global circulation of technology.

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Everlasting Lane Can Be a Harsh Place, Full of Beasts, Both Human and Animal

Everlasting Lane is an excellent reminder of how smart and intuitive children can be and how difficult childhood really is.

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‘Here Comes Kitty’ Disturbs and Delights

Richard Kraft and Danielle Dutton's latest work is a visually stunning, intellectually perplexing postmodern comic.

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What Some Folks Will Go and Do

Anne Tyler is an avowed fan of Eudora Welty's work, but it's Flannery O’Conner’s old woman down the way that came to mind when I read A Spool of Blue Thread.

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Moving Pixels Podcast: 'The Fall' Explores Artificial Intelligence and Identity

// Moving Pixels

"The Fall raises questions about the self and personal identity by considering how an artificial intelligence governs itself.

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