Reviews > Books
Dressing Like Dolls as a Form of Resistance: ‘So Pretty / Very Rotten’

Unlike the western understanding of the word, "Lolitas" engage in a somewhat sexless performance of innocence, fairy tale femininity, and cultural resistance.

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Finally, a Proper Biography of Chrissie Hynde

Despite the analytic difficulties inherently present in Hynde as a subject, Sobsey truly does deliver the goods.

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8 Jun 2017 // 8:30 AM

Dreams Can Be Deadly

The Nightwalker may not make perfect sense once it concludes, but its level of engagement, imagination, and self-reflection makes it unforgettably haunting,

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LGBTQ People at Home, at Ease

Tom Atwood's Kings & Queens in Their Castles celebrates the diversity of the gay, lesbian, and transgender community with a series of beautiful portraits of people in their homes.

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When It Comes to Collecting Vinyl, It’s Better to Be a Freak Than a Snob

John Corbett exposes a beautiful and dusty world forgotten but kept alive by that dying medium known as the vinyl record.

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‘A Woman Looking at Men Looking at Women’: Siri Hustvedt and the Art of Thinking

Hustvedt reminds us that the making and encountering of art is often embodied, rooted in material and biological and neurological functions.

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Sometimes, a Budweiser Is Better

Recreating the world's oldest fermented drinks should make for entertaining reading material. It doesn't.

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Thi Bui Asks Readers to Reconsider Their Assumptions About the Vietnam War

Bui’s powers as a documentarian and oral historian make The Best We Could Do a thought-provoking take on Vietnam and immigrant experiences in general.

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‘The Sisters Chase’ Gives Us a Protagonist Worth Taking the Journey With

Sarah Healy's The Sisters Chase introduces a flawed heroine for the ages in its breezy, affecting narrative.

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Yoshio Aramaki’s ‘The Sacred Era’ Is Anything But a Heavenly Read

As much as I had hoped, Cloud Atlas, The Bone Clocks, or even 1Q84, The Sacred Era is not.

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Joyce Carol Oates’ ‘Dis Mem Ber’ Paces the Blurred Line Between Horror and Reality

For all the horror, the blood and ugliness, nothing in these pages is all that unthinkable.

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The Visual Storytelling of Black Life in America

Graphic novels The Souls of Black Folk, Fire!! The Zora Neale Hurston Story and Six Days in Cincinnati suggest the visual storytelling of black life is almost as vast as black life itself.

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Poetry and Imagery in Abdellah Taïa’s ‘Another Morocco’

Taïa is a writer whose talent shines brightly enough to illuminate the difference between an imitator and an original.

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Author Lee Smith’s Memoir Is a Balance of Sweetness and Heartbreak

Dimestore should take its place alongside Welty’s One Writer’s Beginnings and King’s On Writing as a beautiful and haunting memoir about the American journey.

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The Stories in ‘All Stories Are Love Stories’ Are a Haunting Tribute to Perseverance

Four characters search for healing and resolution in the wake of a San Francisco earthquake.

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‘Hard-Boiled Hollywood’ Is a Fine Entry Point Into the World of Postwar L.A.

Film scholar Jon Lewis takes a look at some of the more infamous happenings in postwar Hollywood while also exploring the political and cultural climate of the day.

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‘Shake It Up’: All the Music That’s Fit to Freak Out About

The Library of America’s rollicking greatest-hits volume of music criticism is an awesomely unwieldy pile of opinion that celebrates not just music, but the very act of appreciating and understanding it.

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The Journey to Paul Gauguin’s Other World Is Well Worth Taking

Graphic novel Gauguin: The Other World traverses the tropical landscapes and surreal mindscape of self-titled “savage” artist Paul Gauguin.

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‘Broad Strokes’ Beautifully Illuminates Often Overlooked Women Artists

Art historian Bridget Quinn is an engaging writer with a knack for choosing the telling anecdote. The result is a fun book full of beautiful art.

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17 May 2017 // 12:30 PM

Make America Cool Again

Joel Dinerstein's The Origins of Cool in Postwar America is an oddly reassuring handbook for the future of resistance

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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