Reviews > Books
Tolstoy, Rasputin, and Teffi, One of Russia’s Greatest Woman Writers

Teffi’s genius lies in applying a light, ironic and at times satirical flair of humour to deeply serious subjects

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‘Digital Signatures’ Finds a World of Sound in a Handful of Songs

How have ears and minds become conditioned to the binary codes that shape contemporary pop music?

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‘Avedon / Warhol’ Is an Astute Juxtaposition of the Two Brightest Stars in the Gagosian Galaxy

Gagosian has a clear-eyed, bird’s eye view on perhaps the most self-evident yet severely complicated relationship in modern art history.

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Looking for a Way to Supplement Your Income? Why Not Steal the Mona Lisa?

All you need is Taylor Bayouth's How to Steal the Mona Lisa to help you figure out how to get away with it.

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Never Again, Until Next Time

David Rieff's exploratory work in In Praise of Forgetting seeks to map the ways in which historical memory acts upon us and can be acted upon.

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The British Library’s Delightful Anthologies of Cats and Dogs in Literature

These charming books include some of the most famous (and infamous) dogs and cats known in literature, along with some lesser known tales and poems.

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Howard Means’ ‘67 Shots’ Crucially Reminds Us That We Can’t Always Trust Those in Charge

Tension and painful memories still hang over Kent State, 46 years after the state-sanctioned murder of students, as does the warning it conveys.

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‘Nitro Mountain’ Is Harrowing and Dark

This is an unabashedly fierce and often violent novel that owes as much to Graham Greene's Brighton Rock as it does to Daniel Woodrell's Winter's Bone.

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‘We Love You, Charlie Freeman’ Ponders Over Watching and Being Watched

This novel tries to find words for the ways in which being other means being constantly under observation.

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‘Homintern’ Is Not as Subversive and Liberating as Its Subject Matter

What was unique and liberating about the gay influence on Western culture? Gregory Woods tells only part of the story.

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To Read ‘Charlotte Brontë: A Fiery Heart’ Is to Fully Inhabit Haworth Parsonage

Claire Harman's biography of Charlotte Bronte sheds new light on a woman too often confounded with her beloved heroine.

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‘Children of Paradise’ Is a Masterpiece of Journalism and Reportage

Children of Paradise is an intellectual history of Iranian politics that helps the reader cut through the spin of mainstream headlines.

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‘Nebula Awards Showcase 2016’ Will Make Your Toes Curl

Experienced sci-fi readers have seen enough hentai to know where Nebula Awards Showcase 2016 is going.

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Retrospeculating On ‘1976’

Lambda Literary Award finalist Megan Volpert invents a mix of memoir and cultural criticism to engage in roundabout reflection on how the year shaped both America and herself.

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World-Building With Few Words in ‘The Transmigration of Bodies’

Yuri Herrera writes short, sparse, powerful novels about the complex violence of border zones.

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Modiano’s ‘Villa Triste’ and the Dull Flâneur

The protagonist in Patrick Modiano's Villa Triste is a monomaniacal flâneur in world shrunk to a few predictable details.

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‘The Killing of Osama Bin Laden’ and the Importance of Truth in Democratic Governance

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Seymour Hersh alleges unprecedented levels of cover-up by the Obama administration over America's role in Syria and elsewhere.

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Share and Share Alike, If We Dare

By 2050, two-thirds of the earth's population will live in cities. How can cities be smart and equitable in managing this growth?

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‘Investigating Lois Lane’ Is as Smart as, Well, Lois Lane Herself

Tim Hanley's book is a compelling read that reveals the ways in which Lois Lane has reflected cultural assumptions about gender.

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‘Paul McCartney: The Life’ Doesn’t Whitewash or Sensationalize

Philip Norman's latest biography is loaded with wonderful passages, fascinating stories and cracking humor.

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Emerging from My Hiatus from Big Budget Games

// Moving Pixels

"I'd gotten burned out on scope and maybe on spectacle in video games, but I think it's time to return to bigger worlds to conquer.

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