Reviews > Books
‘Exit Wounds’: On the Haunting Presence of a Missing Lover

An abandoned lover enlists the help of an abandoned son to identify the corpse of the terrorist victim who betrayed them both.

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Fear and Loathing in Post-war Amsterdam

A bleakly funny book and a classic of Dutch literature, The Evenings tells the tale of a young man dealing with boredom and self-loathing during the last days of 1946.

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‘Everything is Teeth’ Explores an Ambiguous Relationship With Art and Memory

Memoirist Evie Wyld and artist Joe Sumner explore beneath the surface of the graphic memoir form.

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How Should the Story of Revolution Be Told?

UK scholar Helen Rappaport combines thorough scholarship with the stylistic grace of a novelist, and the result is a riveting tale of the Russian Revolution that’s difficult to put down.

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‘Exit West’ Is a Compassionate and Imaginative Fable of Migration

Mohsin Hamid rewrites the rules of time and space to tell the tale of migration in universal terms.

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‘Stephen Stills’ Won’t Be Making an Appearance Tonight

This new biography of Stephen Stills is an entertaining and informative overview of one of rock's most durable legends -- even without Stills' input.

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The Sexual, the Female, and the Forbidden Beckoned: ‘The Oxford History of Witchcraft & Magic’

It is hoped this solid anthology of level-headed observation will supplant spurious New Age-tinged assertions as well as lurid "exposés".

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Less Dogma, More Dissent: Paglia on ‘Sex, Gender, Feminism’

Contrary to what her critics might have one believe, Paglia demands more, not less, of contemporary feminism.

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Idealism to Mass Murder in ‘The Road to Jonestown’

The author of Manson tracks how Jim Jones’ tragic magnetism and promises of racial solidarity and socialist utopia pulled hundreds of people into his fatal orbit.

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Behind Francis Ford Coppola’s Magic, the Work: ‘The Godfather Notebook’

No one other than Coppola could have directed The Godfather, because the mental effort to work Puzo’s world into film is on the level of science fiction.

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Paul Madonna’s ‘On to the Next Dream’ Sketches out a Rapidly Changing San Francisco

Progress -- that is, gentrification -- marches on in San Francisco, for better and for worse, in this fantastical narrative from the creator of All Over Coffee.

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The Story of Hemingway and Dos Passos Is as Exciting as Any of Their Novels

The Ambulance Drivers tells of how Hemingway would use literature to seize the world and Dos Passos would use literature to change it.

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Lars Svendsen Dispels Assumptions About Loneliness

In A Philosophy of Loneliness, Svendsen doesn't so much elucidate the topic of loneliness as he complicates it, thereby dispelling our many illusions.

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‘True South’ and the Foot Soldiers of the Civil Rights Movement

True South functions as a reminder of how great and important Eyes on the Prize is, and why it remains essential.

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‘Elvis’s Army’: Training for a War That Never Came

A masterful look at the US Army between Korea and Vietnam: stumbling into an uncertain future, amid racial integration, endless paperwork, and nuclear-armed jeeps.

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‘Electri_City’ Is Missing the Spark

It took a lot of work in the '70s to make music that sounded like it was created entirely by robots. The same could be said for Electri_City.

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Imagine a World of Trees—Without Us

Bloomsbury's Object Lessons' installment, Tree, brings to the fore our complicated relationship with this life form.

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Between Comfort and Threat, Thriving and Despair: Stories From Iceland

The affluence enjoyed by many in these pages pales before the ultimate mysteries suffusing the island.

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J.D. Wilkes Puts the American South’s Contradictions Up for Reconsideration

A novel that believes monsters are “as much a part of us as our penchant for fried chicken and turnip greens.”

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‘No Quarter’ Neither Galvanises Nor Destroys Jimmy Page’s Mythic Persona

Jimmy Page's mythic reputation is preserved with grace and pathos in Martin Power's biography.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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