Reviews > Books
‘Paris at War’ Is a Definitive, Though Necessarily Incomplete, Monument

David Drake has revived the Nazi Occupation of France with an obsessive and impressive sense of detail.

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‘The Rap Year Book’ Reformats Hip-Hop History

Through colorful illustrations, irreverent humor, and informed writing, The Rap Year Book strikes a perfect balance between incisive commentary and goofy charm.

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Bruce Bauman’s Latest Is a Family Drama of Biblical Proportions

Broken Sleep is brimming with colorful characters, fascinating dialogue, and beautiful yet tragic relationships, making it easy to read and hard to forget.

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The Greater Implications of One Small Act in Ron Rash’s ‘Above the Waterfall’

If Ron Rash is, as he has been described, a "writer's writer" then Above the Waterfall might best be described as a "poet's novel", a book as enjoyable in its language as its story.

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Chuck Wendig’s ‘Zeroes’ Is a Paranoid Techno-thriller That’s Just Right for our Times

It's all too easy to see the ways that the Zeroes' security is constantly compromised, and realize that those are very natural extensions of the technology that surrounds us today.

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On the Sameness and Difference of ‘Warhol & Mapplethorpe’

This new museum book highlights the challenge of housing two giants under one roof, with mixed results.

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Satire and Satisfaction Roll off the Tongue in Goddard’s ‘Rollaresque’

Goddard reinvents the Rolling Stones’ tale of fame and infamy with the bawdy wit of an 18th century picaresque.

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In ‘Killing and Dying’, Drama Is Hidden Between the Lines of Profile Art and Dialogue

Adrian Tomine's latest collection offers poignant, bittersweet and surprisingly filling snapshots of everyday life.

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‘The Doctors Are In’ Tries to Be All Things to All Readers

Alas, the holding of passionate views does not in itself make for compelling reading.

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Coming of Age in Negroland

Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Margo Jefferson tells of her upbringing among Chicago's black upper crust in this meditation on race, class, and gender in America from mid-century on.

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David Mitchell’s ‘Slade House’ Is a Sequel, of Sorts, to ‘The Bone Clocks’

Akin to a bearers of a rare blood type, those selected enter a "Theatre of the Mind" where their "birth-bodies" encounter in Slade House their dreams come true.

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15 Oct 2015 // 6:30 AM

Rebel Hell

In The Rebel's Sketchbook, Rupert Dreyfus writes with the darkly absurd humour of a thirsty and somewhat paranoid Jonathan Swift.

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Asleep at the Wheel’s Ray Benson Is ‘Comin’ Right at Ya’

A six-foot-seven-inch self-proclaimed Jewish hippie from Philly starts a Western swing band at a most inopportune time -- and lives to tell the tale.

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In ‘A House of My Own’ Sandra Cisneros Argues That a Woman Writer Needs a Roof of Her Own

The finest articles in this collection are the most personal.

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Jonathan Franzen Pulls a Convincing Authorial Disappearing Act in ‘Purity’

Franzen's latest is a fulfilling if frustrating exploration of our modern identity crisis.

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For a Book on Technology, Sven Birkerts’ ‘Changing the Subject’ Is Surprisingly Personal

The honesty, lyricism, and thoughtfulness make Changing the Subject a pleasure to read.

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‘Hemingway in Love’ Is Engaging and Harrowing Storytelling

The story of the final years of Hemingway’s life have never been told with such eloquence and compassion.

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Square Pegs and Southern Inhospitality in Melanie Sumner’s ‘How to Write a Novel’

This is a charming and touching reflection on family, belonging, and walking the shaky line between childhood and adulthood.

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Toronto Has Been Home to Some of the Most Successful DJs—and Nightclubs

Then and Now: Toronto Nightlife History currently stands as the most definitive account of nightclub culture in one of Canada’s most celebrated and beloved cities.

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//Mixed media

The Hills Are Alive, But Nobody Else Is in 'The Happiness of the Katakuris'

// Short Ends and Leader

"Happiness of the Katakuris is one of Takashi Miike's oddest movies, and that's saying something.

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