Reviews > Books
A Sock Is Never Just a Sock: Thoughts on Object Lessons’ ‘Sock’

Ian Bogost and Christopher Schaberg, the editors of Object Lessons, have built an incredibly robust template for 21st century pop cultural contemplation.

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Aquaman, Blooperman, Plastic Man, Bee-Man, Fatman: ‘Hero-A-Go-Go’!

Former DC editor Michael Eury offers up a loving look at the age of high cultural camp in comics and more in this collection of campy curios.

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Justice Ginsburg’s Greatest Hits Reminds Us of the Virtues of Dissent

As a history of her good deeds and right thinking, My Own Words showcases in precise detail how the hard work of equality has been moved forward under Ginsburg’s judicious hand.

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‘Solar Bones’ Rewards Immersion

The narrator's headlong rush and gasp recalls Samuel Beckett's put-upon protagonists.

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The Devil Is (or Isn’t) in the Details of “Behaving Badly’s” Search for Morality

Will secular moral solutions ever topple the ideological momentum of an amoral market?

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From the Music, to the Word, to the Body in Motion: ‘Epistrophies’

Epistrophies teaches us to listen for how creative ideas are translated across media and offers tools for identifying and understanding insights that arise from such translations.

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‘Based on a True Story’ Won’t Take Hold of You

The whole book is a non-answer, and to take that risk, the author has to give something in return: a fleshed-out plot, more action, or elevated language.

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‘The Great Jazz and Pop Vocal Albums’ Is Not the Last Word on the Subject

Will Friedwald writes subjectively and is not afraid to be cheeky when he thinks audiences have misunderstood an artist or a release.

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Life “Between and Betwixt Two Worlds”: Diary of a Reluctant Dreamer

With both humor and pathos, Alberto Ledesma’s graphic novel/memoir provides an inside look at the life of an undocumented immigrant.

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Nothing We Need But Everything We Want: Object Lessons’ ‘Shopping Mall’

Commerce and community blend together in this bittersweet reflection of suburban malls.

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Exploring Sacred Space with Jesse Jacob’s ‘Crawl Space’

Evocative of Edwin Abbott’s Flatland, Jacobs takes on environmental destruction, the desecration of the sacred, and the arrogance and selfishness that plague our politics and our world.

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‘Language Barrier’ Illustrates That Words Are Pictures Too

This surreal exploration of the peculiar boundary between words and pictures dives directly into the deep end of the image-text pool.

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The Walkman Is Dead, Long Live the Walkman

Personal Stereo explores novelty, norm, and nostalgia.

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Aberrant Movements: Justifying Thought Without a Ground in Deleuze’s Philosophy

Lapoujade's work on Deleuze attempts to come to grips with the ways in which our constructions of knowledge seek justification: how do we learn to think otherwise?

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Reason on the Cusp of Madness: Anti-Semitism and Mihail Sebastian

The ease with which one can draw a line from the message of For Two Thousand Years to the events of 2017 is almost too terrifying to contemplate.

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What Is Brought Back in Michel Leiris’ ‘Phantom Africa’ Is Not Tangible

Phantom Africa represents a poignant and beautiful window into something more universal.

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On Memory and Nostalgia: Seth’s ‘Palookaville 23’

A wonderful addition to Seth’s already brilliant body of work, Palookaville 23 is a reminder of how much time he’s dedicated to his art, and how worthwhile that time has been.

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Art Garfunkel’s Endearing, Impressionistic, Reflective Thoughts About His Life and Times

In What Is It All but Luminous Garfunkel reveals the soft, lush, probably difficult, and definitely peculiar character that has been taking notes, observing, singing, and remembering for over 50 years.

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Bettany Hughes’ ‘Istanbul’ Evokes the Past and Compels the Future

This learned and lively book by award-winning historian, author, and broadcaster Bettany Hughes offers a riveting biography of a city that has remained relevant for well over two millennia.

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‘Goodnight, L.A.’ and Hello, Hollywood

Unsung heroes of classic rock get their due in this cinematic book.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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