Reviews > Books
What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami

A tightly focused window into a defining avocation of one of the world's great novelists.

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Networking Futures by Jeffrey S. Juris

This stands as a pioneering document of what may yet prove to be a new new world order.

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2 Sep 2008 // 10:59 PM

Journey of a Thousand Miles by Lang Lang

Keys to Lang Lang: The pianist tells his harrowing pre-fame story.

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The Magnificent Monarch by Anna Keay

An examination of this type makes one wonder how much of Charles' time was actually spent governing, since he seemed to spend so much time eating alone, washing feet, and going to chapel.

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Life and Death in the Third Reich by Peter Fritzsche

Fritzsche shows the systematic breakdown and reshaping of a society, which in part paved the way for the Holocaust.

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Say You’re One of Them by Uwem Akpan

There are few ways for many in the first world to become acquainted with how people live in Africa. For a window of understanding, read this book.

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28 Aug 2008 // 10:59 PM

Bit of a Blur by Alex James

Blur was one of the biggest bands of the 1990s, a fact that everyone in the world was keenly aware of unless you lived in the United States.

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The Cambridge Curry Club by Saumya Balsari

Balsari's debut novel is gratefully returned to print, allowing its diaspora tale of intertwined lives to spread out around the world.

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Lonesome Cowgirls and Honky-Tonk Angels, by Kristine M. McCusker

Barn dance radio was its own construct, even if, upon superficial re-inspection, it appears to represent a bygone era of non-cynical musical appreciation.

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The Spare Room by Helen Garner

The old cliché that “you’ve got to laugh” in the face of tragedy is given new meaning by Garner.

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Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar

Many who feel that philosophy is not for them, or is incredibly esoteric, will soon realize it’s as natural a commentary on our lives as jokes about boobs are.

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Savage Barbecue by Andrew Warnes

Warnes nimbly equates barbecue with those other indelible, necessary American pariahs: jazz and the blues — each not fully understood or appreciated but thoroughly recognized.

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Democracy’s Prisoner by Ernest Freeberg

Freeberg demonstrates, at times chillingly, how a nation caught in the grip of a war, popular or otherwise, can demonstrate shockingly little regard for individual liberties.

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Rock ‘n’ Roll Babylon: 50 Years of Sex, Drugs and Rock ‘n’ Roll

Whether it's an about-face, religious conversion denouncing former indulgences or a sincere effort to remain faithful or get clean, there are a lot of rockers quick to blame all of their sins on rock 'n' roll.

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21 Aug 2008 // 10:59 PM

The Lemur by Benjamin Black

Enough red herrings strewn in your path to keep you guessing almost to the end

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The Dark Side by Jane Mayer

As Mayer recounts in her history of what followed 9/11, Cheney was ready for this scenario because he'd been "secretly practicing for doomsday."

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19 Aug 2008 // 11:00 PM

Sex and the Soul by Donna Freitas

Even if values systems and community-based approaches at evangelical campuses are admirable, will they allow students some breathing room when it comes to sexual propriety?

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Touch Me, I’m Sick by Tom Reynolds

Ever the philanthrope, Reynolds hunts through the archives of music history to find 52 of the most chillingly unhinged love songs.

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The Black Death by John Hatcher

From this great tragedy emerges a fascinating power struggle, one that contemporary readers may see as the first stirrings of the modern ideas of liberty and social justice.

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17 Aug 2008 // 10:59 PM

Flower Confidential by Amy Stewart

Revealing the complex processes that make a wide variety of flowers available in markets across the world, what's found often isn't so beautiful.

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