Reviews > Books
If Democrats Had Any Brains, Theyd Be Republicans by Ann Coulter

Coulter has rightly calculated that a healthy dollop of GOP-championing and Dem-bashing can bait true believers into a bookstore.

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6 Jan 2008 // 9:59 PM

I Never Saw Paris by Harry I. Freund

Dialogic exploration of belief in heaven or its alternative, or a tepid exploration of the human tendency for connection and closure?

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Making Waves: New Cinemas of the 1960s by Geoffrey Nowell-Smith

On censorship he says: "It tended to be assumed in European films that human beings were born with sexual organs and at a certain point in their lives began to use them, not always in socially approved ways."

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3 Jan 2008 // 9:59 PM

Babies by Design by Ronald M. Green

Two polar, persuasive stands on reproductive genetics.

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Sleaze Artists by Jeffrey Sconce

It must surely be daunting for any young film scholar with an interest in trash to come face to face with the volume of academic work that’s been done on once-disreputable movies.

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2 Jan 2008 // 9:59 PM

My Unwritten Books by George Steiner

Cultural critic and scholar George Steiner meditates on seven books he planned to write, but never did.

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Mom, Have You Seen My Leather Pants? by Craig A. Williams

The title of Craig A. Williams' memoir just about sums it all up. It's worth reading anyway.

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1 Jan 2008 // 9:59 PM

Slam by Nick Hornby

Writer of 'male confessionals' turns his talent to a teen.

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American Creation by Joseph J. Ellis

One hates to say that it brings history alive, but that's exactly what this kind of storytelling can, and does, accomplish.

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Baltimore by Mike Mignola, Christopher Golden

Christopher Golden and Hellboy scribe Mike Mignola make full use of World War I's carnival of cruelty to foreground their tale of lost love and massacred innocence. Not to mention vampires -- lots of vampires.

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19 Dec 2007 // 10:00 PM

The Year of Living Biblically by A. J. Jacobs

The book details Jacobs's quest to follow every single rule in the Bible for a year.

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The Devils Whisper by Miyuki Miyabe

Despite a fairly salacious premise, this thriller by popular Japanese writer Miyuki Miyabe reads more like a young adult mystery, a Stratemeyer Syndicate novel transposed to modern day Japan.

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17 Dec 2007 // 10:00 PM

Tomorrow by Graham Swift

The protagonist's compelling monologue finds her mining her past to prepare herself for the secrets she must reveal to her children come morning.

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16 Dec 2007 // 10:00 PM

The Granta Book of Reportage by Ian Jack

In an era of media overload and addiction to the immediate, he's demarcating a space for the measured, thoughtful, and in-depth narratives that can only be put together by the man (or woman) on the ground.

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16 Dec 2007 // 9:59 PM

Ludlow by David Mason

For this is nothing if not a human story. If it may be said to have a "message," it's that it is not governments and organizations, ideologies or even grand philosophical notions that are decisive in human affairs.

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13 Dec 2007 // 10:00 PM

God’s Harvard by Hanna Rosin

Rosin’s study provides an accomplished example for future investigations of evangelical politics, and she offers fair and necessary critiques of idealism and limitations of Patrick Henry College.

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13 Dec 2007 // 9:59 PM

Diaries 1969-1979: The Python Years by Michael Palin

No laughing matter: Comics' memoirs reveal seriously hard work, conflict behind success.

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13 Dec 2007 // 9:58 PM

Opium Season: A Year on the Afghan Frontier by Joel Hafvenstein

Switch "Afghan" with "Vietnamese" and you experience a chilling sense of deja vu while reading Opium Season.

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The Murder of Regilla by Sarah B. Pomeroy

Regilla's story demonstrates the importance of a historical voice, and how groups that are marginalized, oppressed, or devalued like the women of antiquity can be squelched by those who dominate them.

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12 Dec 2007 // 9:59 PM

The Day of Battle by Rick Atkinson

Atkinson's earlier work, An Army at Dawn, won the Pulitzer Prize for history in 2003, and, if anything, The Day of Battle is even more engrossing.

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In Defense of the Infinite Universe in 'No Man's Sky'

// Moving Pixels

"The common cries of disappointment that surround No Man’s Sky stem from the exciting idea of an infinite universe clashing with the harsh reality of an infinite universe.

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