Reviews > Books

27 Apr 2008 // 9:59 PM

Frontman by Richard Barone

As a “how to” book, Barone goes about much of his business with tongue in cheek, but his “lessons” are useful enough to earn it a place on musicians’ bookshelves right next to Songwriting for Dummies or Making Money with Your Studio.

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Corporate Warriors by P. W. Singer

By refusing to cast himself as a finger-wagging scold on the subject of military contractors, Singer’s concerns have all that much more power.

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Our Story Begins by Tobias Wolff

Wolff's keen eye for the right phrase, the perfect detail, his ability to represent these characters in all their flawed honesty, make these stories brilliantly his own.

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Beautiful Children by Charles Bock

Bock's characters bob, weave and occasionally collide as they jackknife inexorably onwards towards an anti-climactic conclusion.

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22 Apr 2008 // 9:59 PM

Willie Nelson: An Epic Life by Joe Nick Patoski

New Willie Nelson biography light on revelations, but fans will relish intimate details.

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The Moments Lost by Bruce Olds

At times impressive in scope and range, the narrative ultimately suffers and strangulates under the weight of the author’s use and abuse of alliterations and arcane verbs and nouns.

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20 Apr 2008 // 10:00 PM

Rightward Bound by Bruce J. Schulman, Julian E. Zelizer (Editors)

Jacobs writes that the [1973-74 energy] crisis ultimately taught “conservative reformers a valuable lesson: fighting liberalism is hard”.

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20 Apr 2008 // 9:59 PM

Swimming in a Sea of Death by David Rieff

The subject of Rieff's book is not just Susan Sontag's death. It is also the ways in which our willingness, or refusal, to acknowledge impending death affects our relationships with the people around us.

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17 Apr 2008 // 10:00 PM

Black Space by Adilifu Nama

A thought-provoking and timely exploration of white racial anxieties as projected onto black males in science fiction films.

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Wolves of the Crescent Moon by Yousef Al-Mohaimeed

This intense, fanciful story provides a uniquely slanted window into the manners and culture of Saudi Arabia. Small wonder it was banned in the Kingdom.

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Cornbread Nation 4: by Dale Volberg Reed, John Shelton Reed, John T. Edge (Editors)

A vivid, heart-felt, often lyrical look at some of the most iconic food of the South -- from the commercial to the home-cooked to the most seasonal of delicacies, gathered in the wild.

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16 Apr 2008 // 9:59 PM

Snow Angels by Stewart O’Nan

It doesn’t matter who’s point of view you’re seeing the world from, because one is only slightly more miserable than the next.

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Quiet, Please by Scott Douglas

Douglas explains why library school is useless for an aspiring librarian and also about the many, many different types of crazy people who congregate in libraries.

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15 Apr 2008 // 9:59 PM

Home: A Memoir of My Early Years by Julie Andrews

Andrews still sings; fortunately, she also writes -- a good thing, because there are still four decades left to chronicle.

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15 Apr 2008 // 9:58 PM

Greetings From Bury Park by Sarfraz Manzoor

A journalist reaches manhood with a detour through Bruce Springsteen's world in new book.

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The Martian General’s Daughter by Theodore Judson

This reads as if Judson had scanned part of the Augustan Histories into his computer and then started cutting and pasting.

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Signed, Mata Hari by Yannick Murphy

The ability of fiction to evoke empathy and seek emotional truth transcends mere historical details, and it is these things that Yannick Murphy does so well in her new novel.

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10 Apr 2008 // 10:00 PM

God in the White House by Randall Balmer

Americans want their leaders to have faith, but they don't generally care about the specifics of those beliefs. Balmer dissects the somewhat recent phenomenon.

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Paperback Apocalypse by Robert M. Price

When God gives you lemons, find another God.

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The House of Widows by Askold Melnyczuk

The difference between individual and collective history is blurred, and the miasma of wartime cannot bury individual betrayals.

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